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The Queen discusses terror attacks in Christmas message

The Queen's Christmas message looked at the last year with a 'home' theme
She praised..

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  • The Queen's Christmas message looked at the last year with a 'home' theme
  • She praised the 'powerful identities' of cities in the face of terrorist attacks
  • She paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh who retired from solo public duties
  • The Queen's pre-recorded address from Buckingham Palace was televised

By Kelly Mclaughlin and Sophie Inge For Mailonline

Published: 21:00 EST, 24 December 2017 | Updated: 10:44 EST, 25 December 2017

The Queen praised the resilience of London and Manchester after 'appalling attacks', in a Christmas message that also paid tribute to her husband, Prince Philip, who retired from regular royal duties this year.

The Queen's message to the nation and the Commonwealth looked back over the previous 12 months, taking 'home' as its theme.

The 'powerful identities' of the capital and the northern English city had shone through after militant attacks as well as a devastating fire that destroyed the residential tower block Grenfell Tower in London, the Queen said.

During her televised address to the nation, the Queen praised the 'powerful identities' of London and Manchester that have 'shone through' in the face of terrorist attacks

During her televised address to the nation, the Queen praised the 'powerful identities' of London and Manchester that have 'shone through' in the face of terrorist attacks

The 91 year-old monarch, whose televised address is an essential part of a traditional Christmas in Britain, said it had been a privilege to visit victims of the bomb attack at a pop concert in Manchester, as she was able to witness the bravery and resilience of survivors first-hand.

'This Christmas, I think of London and Manchester, whose powerful identities shone through over the past twelve months in the face of appalling attacks.

'In Manchester, those targeted included children who had gone to see their favourite singer. A few days after the bombing, I had the privilege of meeting some of the young survivors and their parents.

'I describe that hospital visit as a 'privilege' because the patients I met were an example to us all, showing extraordinary bravery and resilience.'

The Queen's message to the nation and the Commonwealth looked back over the previous 12 months, taking 'home' as its themeThe Queen's message to the nation and the Commonwealth looked back over the previous 12 months, taking 'home' as its theme

The Queen's message to the nation and the Commonwealth looked back over the previous 12 months, taking 'home' as its theme

Visible in the background were portraits of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry, Prince Charles and Camilla, as well as the Queen and Prince Philip on their wedding day in 1947 and 70 years later, and photos of their great-grandchildren Prince George and Princess CharlotteVisible in the background were portraits of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry, Prince Charles and Camilla, as well as the Queen and Prince Philip on their wedding day in 1947 and 70 years later, and photos of their great-grandchildren Prince George and Princess Charlotte

Visible in the background were portraits of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry, Prince Charles and Camilla, as well as the Queen and Prince Philip on their wedding day in 1947 and 70 years later, and photos of their great-grandchildren Prince George and Princess Charlotte

The nation endured a series of devastating terrorist atrocities during the year, beginning with the Westminster Bridge attack in March that saw four pedestrians die when an attacker, later shot dead by police, drove at them before fatally stabbing a police officer.

In Manchester a few months later 22 people – including children – were killed when a lone suicide attacker detonated an explosive device as crowds of music fans left Manchester Arena following a performance by US singer Ariana Grande.

There were more deaths in June when three terrorists in a van ploughed into pedestrians on London Bridge then went on a knife rampage in Borough Market, killing eight in total. They were shot dead by police.

On the 60th anniversary of her first televised Christmas address, Elizabeth said her reflections on the year had made her 'grateful for the blessings of home and family', and praised her husband and his 'unique' sense of humour.

The 96-year-old prince, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, has been at the queen's side throughout her 65 years on the throne, and has often grabbed the headlines with his off-colour comments.

The Queen speaks to Amy Barlow, 12, from Rawtenstall, Lancashire, and her mother, Kathy, during a visit to the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital to meet victims of the Manchester terror attackThe Queen speaks to Amy Barlow, 12, from Rawtenstall, Lancashire, and her mother, Kathy, during a visit to the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital to meet victims of the Manchester terror attack

The Queen speaks to Amy Barlow, 12, from Rawtenstall, Lancashire, and her mother, Kathy, during a visit to the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital to meet victims of the Manchester terror attack

The Queen speaks with staff as she visits the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital after the Manchester terror attackThe Queen speaks with staff as she visits the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital after the Manchester terror attack

The Queen speaks with staff as she visits the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital after the Manchester terror attack

Manchester Arena Terror Attack: The Queen speaks to Millie Robson, 15, from Co Durham, and her mother, Marie, during a visit to the Royal Manchester Children's HospitalManchester Arena Terror Attack: The Queen speaks to Millie Robson, 15, from Co Durham, and her mother, Marie, during a visit to the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital

Manchester Arena Terror Attack: The Queen speaks to Millie Robson, 15, from Co Durham, and her mother, Marie, during a visit to the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital

The nation endured a series of devastating terrorist atrocities during the year, beginning with the Westminster Bridge attack in March that saw four pedestrians die. Pictured above, emergency services staff provide medical attention close to the Houses of Parliament in London on March 22The nation endured a series of devastating terrorist atrocities during the year, beginning with the Westminster Bridge attack in March that saw four pedestrians die. Pictured above, emergency services staff provide medical attention close to the Houses of Parliament in London on March 22

The nation endured a series of devastating terrorist atrocities during the year, beginning with the Westminster Bridge attack in March that saw four pedestrians die. Pictured above, emergency services staff provide medical attention close to the Houses of Parliament in London on March 22

In Manchester in May, 22 people were killed when a lone suicide attacker detonated an explosive device as crowds of music fans left Manchester Arena following a performance by US singer Ariana GrandeIn Manchester in May, 22 people were killed when a lone suicide attacker detonated an explosive device as crowds of music fans left Manchester Arena following a performance by US singer Ariana Grande

In Manchester in May, 22 people were killed when a lone suicide attacker detonated an explosive device as crowds of music fans left Manchester Arena following a performance by US singer Ariana Grande

There were more deaths in June when three terrorists in a van ploughed into pedestrians on London Bridge then went on a knife rampage in Borough Market, killing eight in total. Pictured above, people pay their respects on the end of London Bridge with flowers and post it notesThere were more deaths in June when three terrorists in a van ploughed into pedestrians on London Bridge then went on a knife rampage in Borough Market, killing eight in total. Pictured above, people pay their respects on the end of London Bridge with flowers and post it notes

There were more deaths in June when three terrorists in a van ploughed into pedestrians on London Bridge then went on a knife rampage in Borough Market, killing eight in total. Pictured above, people pay their respects on the end of London Bridge with flowers and post it notes

Elizabeth, the world's longest reigning monarch, celebrated her platinum wedding anniversary in November. Philip retired from regular royal duties over the summer having carried out more than 22,000 solo engagements.

'I don't know that anyone had invented the term "platinum" for a 70th wedding anniversary when I was born. You weren't expected to be around that long,' she said.

'Even Prince Philip has decided it's time to slow down a little having, as he economically put it, "done his bit". But I know his support and unique sense of humour will remain as strong as ever.'

Philip has continued to make occasional appearances, and joined other members of the royal family at a Christmas Day church service on their country estate in Sandringham.

Also joining them for the service was Prince Harry's fiancee Meghan Markle who is spending Christmas with the royals – an unprecedented step for someone who is yet to become an official member of the royal family.

The Duchess of Cambridge did not spend Christmas at Sandringham until she and William were man and wife in 2011.

Headline-making events during 2017 include the tragic Grenfell Tower fire, which killed 71 in west London in JuneHeadline-making events during 2017 include the tragic Grenfell Tower fire, which killed 71 in west London in June

Headline-making events during 2017 include the tragic Grenfell Tower fire, which killed 71 in west London in June

The Queen meets firefighters and paramedics during a visit to the Westway Sports Centre, London, which provided temporary shelter for those who have been made homeless in the Grenfell Tower disasterThe Queen meets firefighters and paramedics during a visit to the Westway Sports Centre, London, which provided temporary shelter for those who have been made homeless in the Grenfell Tower disaster

The Queen meets firefighters and paramedics during a visit to the Westway Sports Centre, London, which provided temporary shelter for those who have been made homeless in the Grenfell Tower disaster

The Queen and Prince William meeting members of the local community and emergency services near Grenfell Tower, meeting volunteersThe Queen and Prince William meeting members of the local community and emergency services near Grenfell Tower, meeting volunteers

The Queen and Prince William meeting members of the local community and emergency services near Grenfell Tower, meeting volunteers

Meghan, who will take British citizenship and get baptised by the Church of England before the wedding, will also attend the Christmas Day service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, a spokesperson has confirmed.

She and Harry, 33, who are now living together in a two-bed cottage in the grounds of Kensington Palace, will also take part in the traditional walk to mass by the entire royal family.

The American actress wore a distinctive brown hat as she arrived at the church alongside the Queen's grandson Harry, his elder brother William and his wife Kate.

As they left, both couples briefly chatted to some well-wishers who had gathered to glimpse the royals on Christmas morning.

The Queen, who missed last year's service with a heavy cold, said in her address that she was looking forward to welcoming new members into the royal family next year. As well as Markle, who will marry Harry in May, Kate is expecting a third child.

The royal Christmas broadcast dates back to King George V in 1932 when it was on the radio. It was first televised in 1957.

This year's annual address was produced by Sky News and was recorded in the palace's 1844 room which is decorated with a large tree and features family photos.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's engagement made headlines in November as they announced their marriage plans outside Kensington PalacePrince Harry and Meghan Markle's engagement made headlines in November as they announced their marriage plans outside Kensington Palace

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's engagement made headlines in November as they announced their marriage plans outside Kensington Palace

Philip, famed for his quips, inquisitive mind and 'no-fuss' attitude, stood down from his solo public role in August, although he has made the occasional appearance at events involving the Queen. They're pictured above travelling to Sandringham on December 21 Philip, famed for his quips, inquisitive mind and 'no-fuss' attitude, stood down from his solo public role in August, although he has made the occasional appearance at events involving the Queen. They're pictured above travelling to Sandringham on December 21 

Philip, famed for his quips, inquisitive mind and 'no-fuss' attitude, stood down from his solo public role in August, although he has made the occasional appearance at events involving the Queen. They're pictured above travelling to Sandringham on December 21

Pictures of the Queen's great grandchildren, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, can be seen, along with two wedding related images of the Queen and Philip – but taken 70 years apart.

The royal couple are featured in a black and white image from their 1947 wedding, and in a colour photo released to mark their 70th wedding anniversary celebrated in November.

In the broadcast the Queen wore an ivory white dress by Angela Kelly, an outfit she first wore with a matching coat and hat for the Diamond Jubilee Thames River Pageant in 2012. She also wore a star-shaped diamond brooch.

The Queen joked that she had 'evolved' since her first televised Christmas message 60 years ago in 1957, alongside archive footage of the speech.

'Six decades on, the presenter has 'evolved' somewhat, as has the technology she described.

'Back then, who could have imagined that people would one day be watching this on laptops and mobile phones – as some of you are today.'

25th December 1957: Queen Elizabeth gives her first Christmas Day television speech to her nation25th December 1957: Queen Elizabeth gives her first Christmas Day television speech to her nation

25th December 1957: Queen Elizabeth gives her first Christmas Day television speech to her nation

25th December 1957: Queen Elizabeth gives her first Christmas Day television speech to her nation25th December 1957: Queen Elizabeth gives her first Christmas Day television speech to her nation

25th December 1957: Queen Elizabeth gives her first Christmas Day television speech to her nation

The Queen's speech in full

Sixty years ago today, a young woman spoke about the speed of technological change as she presented the first television broadcast of its kind. She described the moment as a landmark.

Six decades on, the presenter has 'evolved' somewhat, as has the technology she described. Back then, who could have imagined that people would one day be watching this on laptops and mobile phones – as some of you are today. But I'm also struck by something that hasn't changed. That, whatever the technology, many of you will be watching this at home.

We think of our homes as places of warmth, familiarity and love; of shared stories and memories, which is perhaps why at this time of year so many return to where they grew up. There is a timeless simplicity to the pull of home.

For many, the idea of 'home' reaches beyond a physical building – to a home town or city. This Christmas, I think of London and Manchester, whose powerful identities shone through over the past twelve months in the face of appalling attacks. In Manchester, those targeted included children who had gone to see their favourite singer. A few days after the bombing, I had the privilege of meeting some of the young survivors and their parents.

I describe that hospital visit as a 'privilege' because the patients I met were an example to us all, showing extraordinary bravery and resilience. Indeed, many of those who survived the attack came together just days later for a benefit concert. It was a powerful reclaiming of the ground, and of the city those young people call home.

We expect our homes to be a place of safety – 'sanctuary' even – which makes it all the more shocking when the comfort they provide is shattered. A few weeks ago, The Prince of Wales visited the Caribbean in the aftermath of hurricanes that destroyed entire communities. And here in London, who can forget the sheer awfulness of the Grenfell Tower fire?

Our thoughts and prayers are with all those who died and those who lost so much; and we are indebted to members of the emergency services who risked their own lives, this past year, saving others. Many of them, of course, will not be at home today because they are working, to protect us.

Reflecting on these events makes me grateful for the blessings of home and family, and in particular for 70 years of marriage. I don't know that anyone had invented the term platinum' for a 70th wedding anniversary when I was born. You weren't expected to be around that long. Even Prince Philip has decided it's time to slow down a little – having, as he economically put it, 'done his bit'. But I know his support and unique sense of humour will remain as strong as ever, as we enjoy spending time this Christmas with our family and look forward to welcoming new members into it next year.

In 2018 I will open my home to a different type of family: the leaders of the fifty-two nations of the Commonwealth, as they gather in the UK for a summit. The Commonwealth has an inspiring way of bringing people together, be it through the Commonwealth Games – which begin in a few months' time on Australia's Gold Coast – or through bodies like the Commonwealth Youth Orchestra & Choir: a reminder of how truly vibrant this international family is.

Today we celebrate Christmas, which itself is sometimes described as a festival of the home. Families travel long distances to be together. Volunteers and charities, as well as many churches, arrange meals for the homeless and those who would otherwise be alone on Christmas Day. We remember the birth of Jesus Christ whose only sanctuary was a stable in Bethlehem. He knew rejection, hardship and persecution; and yet it is Jesus Christ's generous love and example which has inspired me through good times and bad.

Whatever your own experiences this year; wherever and however you are watching, I wish you a peaceful and very happy Christmas.

The Queen pays tribute to her family as she poses next to photos of her and Prince Philip and her great-grandchildren during her 60th festive speech

The Queen paid tribute to the Royal Family during her 60th Christmas speech as she posed next to photos of her and Prince Philip and her great-grandchildren in the 1844 Room at Buckingham Palace.

The couple featured in a black and white image from their 1947 wedding, and in a colour photo released to mark their 70th wedding anniversary celebrated in November.

Photographs of the Queen's great-grandchildren, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, were also given pride of place.

Pictured left to right: The Queen and Prince Philip on their wedding day in 1947; the royal couple on their 70th wedding anniversary this year; Princess Charlotte's official second birthday portrait; Prince George's official fourth birthday portrait Pictured left to right: The Queen and Prince Philip on their wedding day in 1947; the royal couple on their 70th wedding anniversary this year; Princess Charlotte's official second birthday portrait; Prince George's official fourth birthday portrait 

Pictured left to right: The Queen and Prince Philip on their wedding day in 1947; the royal couple on their 70th wedding anniversary this year; Princess Charlotte's official second birthday portrait; Prince George's official fourth birthday portrait

Taken by photographer Chris Jackson, the portrait of Prince George was issued by Kensington Palace on July 22nd to mark the youngster's fourth birthday.

Commenting on the portrait at the time, Jackson, who is married to Kate's personal assistant Natasha Archer, said he was 'thrilled and honoured' to have been asked to take the picture.

He added: 'He is such a happy boy and certainly injects some fun into a photoshoot.'

The photo of Charlotte, meanwhile, was taken by her mother the Duchess of Cambridge to mark her second birthday on May 2nd.

The Queen and Prince Philip feature in a black and white image from their 1947 weddingThe Queen and Prince Philip feature in a black and white image from their 1947 wedding

The Queen and Prince Philip feature in a black and white image from their 1947 wedding

In the portrait, taken in April, Charlotte can be seen wearing a traditional Fair Isle cardigan in baby blue and yellow from John Lewis that had sold out before the photo was released with a slightly crumpled Peter Pan collar, £12, from Jojo Maman Bébé poking out of the top.

During the speech, her Majesty wore an ivory dress threaded throughout with silk ribbon. Embroidered with gold, silver and ivory spots, the dress is embellished with Swarovski crystals and a silk organza frill.

The Queen first wore the dress, designed by Angela Kelly, on June 3rd 2012, for the Diamond Jubilee River Pageant.

Taken by photographer Chris Jackson, the portrait of Prince George was issued by Kensington Palace on July 22nd to mark the youngster's fourth birthdayTaken by photographer Chris Jackson, the portrait of Prince George was issued by Kensington Palace on July 22nd to mark the youngster's fourth birthdayThe photo of Charlotte was taken by her mother the Duchess of Cambridge to mark her second birthday on May 2ndThe photo of Charlotte was taken by her mother the Duchess of Cambridge to mark her second birthday on May 2nd

Photographs of the Queen's great-grandchildren, Prince George (left) and Princess Charlotte (right), will also be on display

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Australia

Sydney seaplane crash: Exhaust fumes affected pilot, report confirms

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The pilot of a seaplane that crashed into an Australian river, killing all on board, had been left confused and disorientated by leaking exhaust fumes, investigators have confirmed.

The Canadian pilot and five members of a British family died in the crash north of Sydney in December 2017.

All were found to have higher than normal levels of carbon monoxide in their blood, a final report has found.

It recommended the mandatory fitting of gas detectors in all such planes.

British businessman Richard Cousins, 58, died alongside his 48-year-old fiancée, magazine editor Emma Bowden, her 11-year-old daughter Heather and his sons, Edward, 23, and William, 25, and pilot Gareth Morgan, 44. Mr Cousins was the chief executive of catering giant Compass.

The family had been on a sightseeing flight in the de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver plane when it nose-dived into the Hawkesbury River at Jerusalem Bay, about 50km (30 miles) from the city centre.

The final report by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) confirmed the findings of an interim report published in 2020.

It said pre-existing cracks in the exhaust collector ring were believed to have released exhaust gas into the engine bay. Holes left by missing bolts in a firewall then allowed the fumes to enter the cabin.

“As a result, the pilot would have almost certainly experienced effects such as confusion, visual disturbance and disorientation,” the report said.

“Consequently, it was likely that this significantly degraded the pilot’s ability to safely operate the aircraft.”

The ATSB recommended the Civil Aviation Safety Authority consider mandating the fitting of carbon monoxide detectors in piston-engine aircraft that carry passengers.

It previously issued safety advisory notices to owners and operators of such aircraft that they install detectors “with an active warning” to pilots”. Operators and maintainers of planes were also advised to carry out detailed inspections of exhaust systems and firewalls.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55862128

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Australia

Australia unlikely to fully reopen border in 2021, says top official

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Australia is unlikely to fully open its borders in 2021 even if most of its population gets vaccinated this year as planned, says a senior health official.

The comments dampen hopes raised by airlines that travel to and from the country could resume as early as July.

Department of Health Secretary Brendan Murphy made the prediction after being asked about the coronavirus’ escalation in other nations.

Dr Murphy spearheaded Australia’s early action to close its borders last March.

“I think that we’ll go most of this year with still substantial border restrictions,” he told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on Monday.

“Even if we have a lot of the population vaccinated, we don’t know whether that will prevent transmission of the virus,” he said, adding that he believed quarantine requirements for travellers would continue “for some time”.

Citizens, permanent residents and those with exemptions are allowed to enter Australia if they complete a 14-day hotel quarantine at their own expense.

Qantas – Australia’s national carrier – reopened bookings earlier this month, after saying it expected international travel to “begin to restart from July 2021.”

However, it added this depended on the Australian government’s deciding to reopen borders.

Australia’s tight restrictions

The country opened a travel bubble with neighbouring New Zealand late last year, but currently it only operates one-way with inbound flights to Australia.

Australia has also discussed the option of travel bubbles with other low-risk places such as Taiwan, Japan and Singapore.

A vaccination scheme is due to begin in Australia in late February. Local authorities have resisted calls to speed up the process, giving more time for regulatory approvals.

Australia has so far reported 909 deaths and about 22,000 cases, far fewer than many nations. It reported zero locally transmitted infections on Monday.

Experts have attributed much of Australia’s success to its swift border lockdown – which affected travellers from China as early as February – and a hotel quarantine system for people entering the country.

Local outbreaks have been caused by hotel quarantine breaches, including a second wave in Melbourne. The city’s residents endured a stringent four-month lockdown last year to successfully suppress the virus.

Other outbreaks – including one in Sydney which has infected about 200 people – prompted internal border closures between states, and other restrictions around Christmas time.

The state of Victoria said on Monday it would again allow entry to Sydney residents outside of designated “hotspots”, following a decline in cases.

While the measures have been praised, many have also criticised them for separating families across state borders and damaging businesses.

Dr Murphy said overall Australia’s virus response had been “pretty good” but he believed the nation could have introduced face masks earlier and improved its protections in aged care homes.

In recent days, Australia has granted entry to about 1,200 tennis players, staff and officials for the Australian Open. The contingent – which has recorded at least nine infections – is under quarantine.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55699581

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Australia

Covid: Brisbane to enter three-day lockdown over single infection

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The Australian city of Brisbane has begun a snap three-day lockdown after a cleaner in its hotel quarantine system became infected with coronavirus.

Health officials said the cleaner had the highly transmissible UK variant and they were afraid it could spread.

Brisbane has seen very few cases of the virus beyond quarantined travellers since Australia’s first wave last year.

It is the first known instance of this variant entering the Australian community outside of hotel quarantine.

The lockdown is for five populous council areas in Queensland’s state capital.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced the measure on Friday morning local time, about 16 hours after the woman tested positive.

Ms Palaszczuk said the lockdown aimed to halt the virus as rapidly as possible, adding: “Doing three days now could avoid doing 30 days in the future.”

“I think everybody in Queensland… knows what we are seeing in the UK and other places around the world is high rates of infection from this particular strain,” she said.

“And we do not want to see that happening here in our great state.”

Australia has reported 28,500 coronavirus infections and 909 deaths since the pandemic began. By contrast, the US, which is the hardest-hit country, has recorded more than 21 million infections while nearly 362,000 people have died of the disease.The lockdown will begin at 18:00 on Friday (08:00 GMT) in the Brisbane city, Logan and the Ipswich, Moreton and Redlands local government areas.

Residents will only be allowed to leave home for certain reasons, such as buying essential items and seeking medical care.

For the first time, residents in those areas will also be required to wear masks outside of their homes.

Australia has faced sporadic outbreaks over the past year, with the most severe one in Melbourne triggering a lockdown for almost four months.

A pre-Christmas outbreak in Sydney caused fresh alarm, but aggressive testing and contact-tracing has kept infection numbers low. The city recorded four local cases on Friday.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government has pledged to start mass vaccinations in February instead of March as was planned.

Lockdown interrupts ‘near normal’ life in Brisbane

Simon Atkinson, BBC News in Brisbane

At 8:00 today I popped to the local supermarket for some bread, milk – and because it’s summer here – a mango. I was pretty much the only customer.

When I went past the same shop a couple of hours later it was a different story – 50 people standing in the drizzle – queuing to get inside as others emerged with bulging shopping bags. “Heaps busier than Christmas,” a cheery trolley attendant told me. “It’s off the scale”.

Despite the “don’t panic” messages from authorities, pictures on social media show it’s a pattern being repeated across the city.

While shutdowns are common around the world, the tough and sudden stay-at-home order for Brisbane has caught people on the hop here after months of near normality.

But while such a rapid, hard lockdown off the back of just a single case of Covid-19 will seem crazy in some parts of the world, I’ve not come across too many people complaining.

And I don’t think that’s just because Aussies love to follow a rule. This is the first time the UK variant of the virus has been detected in the community in Australia.

And nobody here wants Brisbane to go through what Melbourne suffered last year. Even if it means going without mangoes.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55582836

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