Australia

Go underwater with the Titanic and see shipwreck

  • A new virtual reality experience takes users below the surface to explore Titanic
  • The exhibition features more than 300 artefacts and replicas of ship's cabins
  • Personal items like jewellery, watches, items and clothing are displayed
  • The display includes stories of Australian crew members and survivors

By Fiona Connor and Brianne Tolj For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 00:31 EST, 13 January 2018 | Updated: 00:33 EST, 13 January 2018

More than three decades after the Titanic shipwreck was found at the bottom of the Atlantic, a new virtual reality experience takes users below the surface to explore the site.

Titanic the Exhibition allows history buffs to wander the reconstructed replicas of the bedrooms and hallways of the British liner and now includes the spectacular technology giving viewers the opportunity to journey through the wreckage.

Stunning graphics made possible by front line innovation takes audiences into the shipwreck through a virtual dive vessel to the depths of the freezing waters.

A new virtual reality experience takes users below the water's surface to explore Titanic

A new virtual reality experience takes users below the water's surface to explore Titanic

Spectacular technology gives viewers the opportunity to journey through the wreckageSpectacular technology gives viewers the opportunity to journey through the wreckage

Spectacular technology gives viewers the opportunity to journey through the wreckage

Graphics made possible by front line innovation takes audiences into the shipwreckGraphics made possible by front line innovation takes audiences into the shipwreck

Graphics made possible by front line innovation takes audiences into the shipwreck

Usually reserved for a select few, the VR experience fully immerses visitors below the water's surface, allowing a new perspective to be built around the remains of 'The Ship of Dreams'.

While browsing more than 300 original artefacts from the survivors and the 1,495 people who died when the ship hit an iceberg on its way to New York on April 15, 1912 the showcase gives remarkable insight into the devastating tragedy.

A century after the Titanic sunk, observers are invited to put themselves in the place of the 2,208 passengers on board.

The Imagine Exhibitions production voyaged to Sydney to bring to life the exhibition opened to the public at the Byron Kennedy Hall until February 4.

The exhibition features 375 artefacts, replicas of the ship’s rooms and the heartfelt stories of the passengers on board and what they felt the night the large ship sunk into the freezing cold water.

Some of the artefacts displayed in glass cases were found floating in the water after the boat sank or were hidden in the pockets of people who survived the disaster.

Many others were donated by families of passengers.

They range from the fine china, silverware and chairs displayed in the dining rooms to a pocket watch and clothing.

The iconic grand staircase (pictured) of the Titanic is replicated for people to observe in first person at the Titanic the Exhibition, open in Sydney The iconic grand staircase (pictured) of the Titanic is replicated for people to observe in first person at the Titanic the Exhibition, open in Sydney 

The iconic grand staircase (pictured) of the Titanic is replicated for people to observe in first person at the Titanic the Exhibition, open in Sydney

The grand staircase replica aims to help place visitors in the shoes of the passengers of the Titanic (pictured)The grand staircase replica aims to help place visitors in the shoes of the passengers of the Titanic (pictured)

The grand staircase replica aims to help place visitors in the shoes of the passengers of the Titanic (pictured)

The exhibition features artefacts and replicas of the passenger liners cabins from first class and third class (pictured)The exhibition features artefacts and replicas of the passenger liners cabins from first class and third class (pictured)

The exhibition features artefacts and replicas of the passenger liners cabins from first class and third class (pictured)

A personal flaskA personal flask

A chair from the second class dining room (pictured) and a personal flask (pictured right) are just a couple of the more than 375 artefacts on display at the exhibition

Memorabilia from the blockbuster movie Titanic are also on display, including the 'heart of the ocean' necklaceMemorabilia from the blockbuster movie Titanic are also on display, including the 'heart of the ocean' necklace

Memorabilia from the blockbuster movie Titanic are also on display, including the 'heart of the ocean' necklace

Life saver's jackets used in James Cameron's movie Titanic that were handed out to passengers (pictured). About 705 people out of the 2,223 passengers survived the tragedy  Life saver's jackets used in James Cameron's movie Titanic that were handed out to passengers (pictured). About 705 people out of the 2,223 passengers survived the tragedy  

Life saver's jackets used in James Cameron's movie Titanic that were handed out to passengers (pictured). About 705 people out of the 2,223 passengers survived the tragedy

Memorbilia from the James Cameron blockbuster Titanic are also on display – including the infamous ‘heart of the ocean’ necklace worn by Kate Winslet.

The reconstructed rooms of the ship provide visitors with a first-person look at the ship’s lavish interior that was applauded at the time it began its maiden and only voyage.

Some of the replicas include a first class cabin and dining area, a third class cabin and the grand staircase that was made infamous by the 1997 movie Titanic.

A woman's chiffon beige dressA woman's chiffon beige dress

The outfit worn by the character Jack in the 1997 movie Titanic (pictured left) and the beige and the dress his love interest Rose wore as the boat sank (right)

A crisp white crew members jacketA crisp white crew members jacketA lavish deep purple dress of what could be a first class female passengerA lavish deep purple dress of what could be a first class female passenger

A crisp white crew members jacket (pictured right) and a lavish deep purple dress that was worn by the movie Titanic character Rose (pictured right)

A crew member's uniform and hat (pictured) A crew member's uniform and hat (pictured) 

A crew member's uniform and hat (pictured)

The exhibition features artefacts, replicas of the ship’s rooms and the heartfelt stories of the passengers on board and what they felt the night the large ship sunk into the freezing cold waterThe exhibition features artefacts, replicas of the ship’s rooms and the heartfelt stories of the passengers on board and what they felt the night the large ship sunk into the freezing cold water

The exhibition features artefacts, replicas of the ship’s rooms and the heartfelt stories of the passengers on board and what they felt the night the large ship sunk into the freezing cold water

Visitors can also see a reconstruction of a first class stateroom, the boiler room, promenade deck and the iceberg that struck the boat at midnight.

People can place themselves in the spaces and experience the grandeur of impressive passenger liner.

The real stories of the crew members and survivors, including Australian passengers, are presented to visitors, along with images of the ship’s final resting place deep in the dark water of the ocean.

A reconstruction of the top deck, complete with the bright stars and dark sky of the night the ship sunk (pictured)A reconstruction of the top deck, complete with the bright stars and dark sky of the night the ship sunk (pictured)

A reconstruction of the top deck, complete with the bright stars and dark sky of the night the ship sunk (pictured)

A worn black teddy bear that was recovered from the shipA worn black teddy bear that was recovered from the ship

A Steiff teddy bear (pictured left) that were sold to raise money for victims of the disaster – one of only 600 made. An image of the titanic in a seashell frame (pictured left)

The Titanic was built to cater to more than 2,000 passengers and was on it's maiden voyage when it struck an iceberg (pictured) The Titanic was built to cater to more than 2,000 passengers and was on it's maiden voyage when it struck an iceberg (pictured) 

The Titanic was built to cater to more than 2,000 passengers and was on it's maiden voyage when it struck an iceberg (pictured)

A Webley revolver that belonged to an officer (pictured) A Webley revolver that belonged to an officer (pictured) 

A Webley revolver that belonged to an officer (pictured)

Original Article

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *