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Liverpool FC anthem singer Gerry Marsden dies aged 78

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Gerry and the Pacemakers singer Gerry Marsden, whose version of You’ll Never Walk Alone became a football terrace anthem for his hometown club of Liverpool, has died at the age of 78.

His family said on Sunday he died after a short illness not linked to Covid-19.

Marsden’s band was one of the biggest success stories of the Merseybeat era, and in 1963 became the first to have their first three songs top the chart.

But the band’s other best known hit was Ferry Cross The Mersey came in 1964.

It was written by Marsden himself as a tribute to his city, and reached number eight.

Marsden was made an MBE in 2003 for services to charity after supporting victims of the Hillsborough disaster.

At the time, he said he was “over the moon” to have received the honour, following his support for numerous charities across Merseyside and beyond.

Liverpool FC posted on social media that Marsden’s words would “live on forever with us”.

While Marsden was a songwriter as well as a singer, his most enduring hit was actually a cover of a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical number from 1945, that he had to convince his bandmates to record as their third single.

In many interviews over the years, he explained how fate played a part in his band ever recording the song. He was watching a Laurel and Hardy movie at Liverpool’s Odeon cinema in the early 1960s and, only because it was raining, he decided to stay for the second part of a double feature.

That turned out to be the film Carousel – which featured that song on its soundtrack – and Marsden was so moved by the lyrics that he became determined that it should become part of his band’s repertoire.

In a 2013 interview, Marsden told the Liverpool FC website how You’ll Never Walk Alone was adopted by the club’s fans as soon as it topped the chart in 1963: “I remember being at Anfield and before every kick off they used to play the top 10 from number 10 to number one, and so You’ll Never Walk Alone was played before the match. I was at the game and the fans started singing it.

“When it went out of the top 10 they took the song off the playlist and then for the next match the Kop were shouting ‘Where’s our song?’ So they had to put it back on.

“Now, every time I go to the game I still get goose pimples when the song comes on and I sing my head off.”

Sir Kenny Dalglish, who managed Liverpool at the time of the Hillsborough tragedy, tweeted that he was “saddened” by the news of Marsden’s death, and that You’ll Never Walk Alone was an “integral part of Liverpool Football Club, and never more so than now”.

Analysis

By BBC Radio Merseyside’s Spencer Leigh

Gerry was an entertainer. He loved being an entertainer; he loved people seeing him in the street and asking him for his autograph and the like.

He had a very distinctive voice, and that is terribly important. You knew instantly it was him on those records. He was best on those ballads.

I think he really did them very well indeed. You’ll Never Walk Alone was a big show song that had been around for years and years, and lots of people had done it.

Just before Gerry brought his version out, Johnny Mathis brought his out. If that version had been played on the Kop, I don’t think the Kop would have taken to it because you couldn’t sing along with Johnny Mathis – he had too big a range and too perfect a voice.

But Gerry sounded like everyman and it was absolutely perfect for the Kop. I think it’s the greatest football anthem of the lot.

As well as being a Liverpool anthem, You’ll Never Walk Alone has also been adopted by fans at both Celtic in Scotland and Borussia Dortmund in Germany.

Liverpool City Region Mayor Steve Rotheram posted a tribute on Twitter, saying he was “devastated” by the news.

Marsden’s career began at legendary live music venue, The Cavern Club, where The Pacemakers played nearly 200 times.

The club said on Twitter that Marsden was “not only a legend, but also a very good friend of The Cavern”.

Gerry and The Pacemakers were spotted by Beatles manager Brian Epstein, who gave them the song How Do You Do It, which had been turned down by the Fab Four and Adam Faith, for their debut single.

The band achieved nine hit singles and two hit albums between 1963 and 1965, before splitting up.

Marsden pursued a solo career before the band reformed in 1974 for a world tour.

In 1985, Marsden was back in the pop spotlight when he was invited to be one of the vocalists of a charity version of You’ll Never Walk Alone, which was released to raise funds for victims of a fire at a Bradford City match.

In doing so, Marsden set another chart record by becoming the first person to sing on two different chart-topping versions of the same song.

So when, after the Hillsborough tragedy in 1989, the other Pacemakers classic of Ferry Cross The Mersey was chosen to raise funds for its victims and a group of famous Liverpudlian singers was gathered, Marsden was again included and was back at number one once more for a cause he held dear for the rest of his life.

Marsden was awarded the Freedom of Liverpool in April 2009, an occasion he marked by boarding a ferry across the Mersey and getting out his guitar to sing his famous hit which described the scene.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-55524795

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Afghan artists destroy their work fearing Taliban retribution

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cnn– Residents of Kabul can read the writing on the wall. “Don’t trust the propaganda of the enemy” says one freshly painted sign.
The message replaced a mural of US envoy Zalmay Khalilzad and Taliban leader Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar shaking hands, marking the signing of the 2020 agreement to withdraw American troops from Afghanistan — one of dozens of vibrant public artworks that have been erased since the Taliban took power in August.
While some of the murals were overt in their demands for equal rights for women and an end to corruption, other pieces were meant to provoke thought, inspire hope, and spread joy to passersby. Today, they’re obscured by thick layers of paint, as well as Taliban slogans and flags.
The move has been received as a warning shot to the country’s arts and culture scene. “The biggest fear for me, and most of the artists I work with… is not being able to express ourselves, to criticize the power,” said curator Omaid Sharifi over WhatsApp. He is the co-founder of ArtLords, a grassroots arts initiative that has transformed protective blast walls into sites of creative expression for nearly a decade.
“The fear is that this society will become just black and white… (and) that we will not have the beautiful diversity and beautiful colors in this country anymore.”
This is not the first time the Taliban has taken a stand against the arts in Afghanistan. When the Taliban was last in power, from 1996 to 2001, the regime defaced public paintings and destroyed cultural heritage sites around the country. In 1996, members machine-gunned an iconic fountain in the city of Herat, in western Afghanistan; while in 2001, they blew up two colossal statues of the Buddha that had looked over the Bamiyan Valley for 1500 years. Most forms of music were banned, and television was declared un-Islamic.
The hardline group insists their rule will be different this time around. But many artists are skeptical.
Watching the Taliban destroy nearly 100 of the murals he and the ArtLords team produced, Sharifi does not see room for artists to thrive under a Taliban regime. He, along with many of his colleagues, have either fled Kabul or are living in hiding.
Some artists, he added, have made the difficult decision to destroy their own work out of fear of retribution. “The feeling of destroying a piece of art is not very far from losing a child… because it is your own creation. It is something you have memories with… something you’ve dreamt about,” he explained. “Suddenly you are putting fire to it — to all your dreams your aspirations to all your hopes.
“No one should go through this. And we don’t deserve, as artists in Afghanistan, to go through this.”
One artist and gallery owner, who asked to remain anonymous, said that having to destroy his own work is a “wound that will not be healed.” He is also concerned for his livelihood, telling CNN that shutting down the gallery has threatened his income.
“I thought that through my art I might be able to solve my family’s financial problems,” he said. “We spent our youth serving, hoping we may have a better tomorrow, but [it’s] such a pity what type of people decide our future in this country.”
One female artist, who also shared her story on the condition of anonymity, felt the stakes were higher because of her gender. She told CNN that ever since the center where she took art classes was shut down, she no longer has a space to practice her art. She explains it is easier for her male classmates to resume their art than it is for women like herself.
“The boys, they can go to a teacher’s home, and they can continue their work from there. They can gather informally…But for girls, it’s not possible to do that,” she said. For women, she added, meeting at a place that is not a formal center for learning is uncommon. “We are so fearful of what might happen, that we don’t even want to try it”.
She also feels repressed due to her subject matter. Specializing in female portraits, she fears that if her work is viewed by the Taliban, she will face retribution. “Women’s faces are not meant to be uncovered. It is wrong according to the Taliban.”
She wants to continue her practice but says the studio that was once a safe space for her creative expression is now a stationery store. She hopes her drawings can be viewed by the world, but for now she must find a way to continue to make art in Afghanistan.

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Cannes Film Festival 2021: Sean Penn’s Flag Day among line-up

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A new film directed by Sean Penn is among the movies set to premiere at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival.

The event will take place in person next month, but with strict Covid safety measures in place for attendees.

Flag Day, which Penn also stars in alongside Josh Brolin, is an adaptation of the book by Jennifer Vogel.

It tells the story of a father who lives a double life as a counterfeiter, bank robber and conman in order to provide for his daughter.

Penn’s previous directing efforts have included Into The Wild, The Pledge and The Crossing Guard.

Flag Day will also star Miles Teller and Eddie Marsan, alongside Penn’s daughter Dylan.

It’s one of several films organisers announced on Thursday for this year’s festival, which will run from 6 to 17 July.

Other Cannes highlights

  • French director Mia Hansen-Love will premiere Bergman Island, about an American filmmaking couple who retreat to an island for the summer to each write screenplays for their upcoming films. It stars Tim Roth, Mia Wasikowska and Vicky Krieps, who was previously seen in Phantom Thread
  • Tom McCarthy will return with his first dramatic film since winning the best picture Oscar for Spotlight. Still Water will see Matt Damon star as a father trying to exonerate his estranged daughter of a murder she never committed
  • Director Oliver Stone will premiere JFK Revisited: Through The Looking Glass. No further details beyond the title have yet been announced
  • Actress Charlotte Gainsbourg, the daughter of Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg, will make her directorial debut with Jane Par Charlotte
  • Other directors debuting their films include Andrea Arnold, who will premiere Cow, and Todd Haynes, who will unveil The Velvet Underground
  • Previous Palme d’Or winners Jacques Audiard and Apichatpong Weerasethakul will debut their new films Les Olympiades and Memoria respectively
  • Eva Husson’s Mothering Sunday and Red Rocket by The Florida Project’s Sean Baker have also been announced

It was previously confirmed that the opening night film will be Annette from director Leos Carax and starring Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard.

Wes Anderson’s new film The French Dispatch, starring Timothee Chalamet, Elisabeth Moss, Tilda Swinton and Frances McDormand, and Paul Verhoeven’s Benedetta, were also confirmed to be running in competition.

Organisers announced earlier this week that Jodie Foster will receive an honorary Palme d’Or at the 2021 festival.

Spike Lee will head up the jury that hands out the festival’s official awards. The Oscar-winning filmmaker was set to be jury president for the 2020 festival, but that was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“Cinema is not dead,” said Cannes artistic director Thierry Frémaux on Thursday. “The return of audiences to movie theatres around the world was the first good news. And the festival will be the second good news.”

The closing night film has not yet been confirmed, however Frémaux indicated that he has a major blockbuster premiere still to reveal.

Four of the 24 films in competition this year have female directors, which Variety said matched the event’s previous record, set in 2019.

They are Hansen-Love, Catherine Corsini, Julia Ducournau and Ildikó Enyedi. Female directors elsewhere in the line-up include Eva Husson, Hafsia Herzi, Gainsbourg and Arnold.

The festival previously announced that it will require attendees to be tested for Covid-19 every 48 hours if they have not been fully vaccinated, or show proof of immunity.

France’s audience limit in cinemas is set to lift on 1 July, which means all films should, in theory, be able to screen to full-capacity crowds.

However, masks will still need to be worn during screenings. It is not yet clear whether they will also be required on the red carpet.

 

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-57346620

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Diane Keaton Dishes on Talk Show Style and Modeling for Gucci

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Diane Keaton is a talk show veteran. Over the course of her impressive career, the actor has sat down with David Letterman, Jimmy Kimmel and everyone else in between. Along the way, she’s always served bold fashion, bringing her penchant for strong shapes, dramatic chapeaus, and black-and-white ensembles to our TV screens. Where other Hollywood actors often embrace glitz and glam for press appearances, Keaton has always stayed true to her more quirky, menswear-inspired look no matter the occasion.

It’s no wonder, then, that Gucci has tapped her for a new talk show-inspired campaign for Gucci Beloved. The photo series, directed by Harmony Korine and released today, highlights the label’s four most beloved handbag styles, including the Dionysus and Jackie 1961 bags. To showcase them, creative director Alessandro Michele recreated a late-night talk show set for the shoot (complete with James Corden as host) titled the “Beloved Show.” They enlisted Hollywood stars to guest-star while toting the classic bags. “Very often, these creations are named after influential women,” says Michele. “Now, we twisted with the idea that there were two stars: the bag and the actual talent.”

The campaign features cameos from Keaton, Awkwafina, Dakota Johnson, Harry Styles, Serena Williams, and Sienna Miller, all of whom sport the luxury bags. But Keaton’s cameo undoubtedly stands out. In the photos, she wears a tan suit, red beret, and Gucci’s monogram Horsebit 1955 bag—a very Keaton look. “Not only is Alessandro beyond talented and gorgeous, I love his vision and his gentle nature,” says Keaton of the campaign. “I must also say that working with James Corden was a delight. He is so relaxed and born to be a hilarious host. It’s not fair.”

Starring in Gucci’s faux talk show was an easier task than partaking in the real deal, says Keaton. “I always prepare and I am always anxious. It is my nature,” she says, adding that she’s developed a nervous habit on the talk shows. “No matter what I wear, if you look closely, you will notice I always sit on my leg. It ruins every outfit, but it is something I inherited from my dear father, Jack Hall.”

While Keaton has enjoyed many fashion home runs on the talk shows over the years—please refer to the “dope” cap she wore on Ellen in 2018 for evidence—the star says she does have her favorite moments. Particularly, the frequent fashion talk on Letterman. “David Letterman always wanted to talk about what I wear,” recalls Keaton. “On several trips to his show, he wanted to focus on my outfit that I wore to the Oscars in 1978 [a Giorgio Armani blazer and skirt]. I put together the outfit and I thought I looked good. I got lots of slack for that, but I honestly wear what I like and I thought that ensemble was stylin’!”

And she’s right! What has made Keaton such an indelible style icon is her consistency and personality. But this spring and summer, she’s looking to shake things up… Just a bit. “I think I will give navy blue a try this spring, but I am never letting go of black, camel, and white for the spring and summer. Don’t forget with gloves, plus hats!”

Below, more of the celebrity cameos in Gucci Beloved’s new campaign.

Read from source: https://www.vogue.com/article/diane-keaton-gucci-campaign-star

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