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Fingerprint algorithm helps ID bodies found decades ago

The algorithm can make matches from low-quality prints from a single finger Previously, techniques n..

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  • The algorithm can make matches from low-quality prints from a single finger
  • Previously, techniques needed quality prints from all 10 fingers to make a match
  • One of the key cases cracked using the technique dates back to 1983

By Associated Press and Shivali Best For Mailonline

Published: 01:14 EDT, 31 October 2017 | Updated: 10:35 EDT, 31 October 2017

An incredible new fingerprint algorithm is helping the FBI to identify bodies dating back to the 1970s.

The algorithm can make matches from low-quality prints or even a single finger or thumb.

Previously, the standard algorithm typically needed quality prints from all 10 fingers to make a match.

Since launching the new effort in February, the FBI has identified 204 bodies found between 1975 and the late 1990s.

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An incredible new fingerprint algorithm is helping the FBI to identify bodies dating back to the 1970s. The algorithm can make matches from low-quality prints or even a single finger or thumb (stock image)

An incredible new fingerprint algorithm is helping the FBI to identify bodies dating back to the 1970s. The algorithm can make matches from low-quality prints or even a single finger or thumb (stock image)

HOW DOES IT WORK?

The computer algorithm can make matches from low-quality prints or even a single finger or thumb by looking at a variety of patterns in the prints.

It can be used to identify bodies dating back to the 1970s.

Previously, the standard algorithm typically needed quality prints from all 10 fingers to make a match.

Since launching the new effort in February, the FBI and local medical examiner offices have identified 204 bodies found between 1975 and the late 1990s.

The cases stretch across the country, with the largest number in Arizona, California, New York, Florida and Texas.

Over the past year, the FBI and local medical examiner offices have identified bodies from across the US, with the largest number in Arizona, California, New York, Florida and Texas.

'We didn't know the actual potential success. We were hoping to identify a few cases, maybe five or 10,' said Bryan Johnson, a manager in the FBI's Latent Fingerprint Support Unit who proposed the effort.

'We're really proud that we found another way of doing this.'

Under the new program, Mr Johnson and eight others in the FBI unit ran fingerprints from about 1,500 bodies through a new computer algorithm that could make matches from low-quality prints or even a single finger or thumb.

Previously, the standard algorithm typically needed quality prints from all 10 fingers to make a match.

The unit is now urging local authorities to search through other old case files and send in smudged or partial prints that couldn't previously be matched.

One of the key cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey, who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983.

This spring, Mr Downey's brother, James, received a call from authorities, reporting that the remains of a man found beaten to death decades ago along a brushy path in Des Moines, 800 miles away, had been identified as John.

'We always figured something had happened to him,' James Downey said from his home in Houston.

'We all assumed he'd got killed somewhere or died in an accident.'

 One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey, who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983. Pictured are experts examining the case One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey, who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983. Pictured are experts examining the case

One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey, who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983. Pictured are experts examining the case

The FBI's newfound ability was key to the Des Moines case because by the time Mr Downey's body was found in February 1984, it had been buried under snow and dirt for months and was severely decomposed.

Authorities sought the public's help in identifying the body, including publishing drawings of distinctive tattoos in the local newspaper, but no one came forward.

'We know he was murdered and dumped in this area but Des Moines police never really developed any leads on it and basically forgot about the case,' county Medical Examiner Greg Schmunk said.

It was one of several cases that medical examiner investigators called 'shelf dwellers,' referring to cremated remains that would sit for decades on storage shelves.

IDENTIFYING THE BODY OF JOHN DOWNEY

 One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey (pictured), who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983 One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey (pictured), who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983

One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey (pictured), who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983

One of the cases that the new algorithm has helped to solve is that of John Downey, who disappeared after Thanksgiving Day in 1983.

This spring, Mr Downey's brother, James, received a call from authorities, reporting that the remains of a man found beaten to death decades ago along a brushy path in Des Moines, 800 miles away, had been identified as John.

The FBI's newfound ability was key to the Des Moines case because by the time Mr Downey's body was found in February 1984, it had been buried under snow and dirt for months and was severely decomposed.

Authorities sought the public's help in identifying the body, including publishing drawings of distinctive tattoos in the local newspaper, but no one came forward.

'We know he was murdered and dumped in this area but Des Moines police never really developed any leads on it and basically forgot about the case,' county Medical Examiner Greg Schmunk said.

It was one of several cases that medical examiner investigators called 'shelf dwellers,' referring to cremated remains that would sit for decades on storage shelves.

But the fact that this was a homicide and the unusual tattoos – including a skeleton clad in Nazi garb and a cartoon figure wearing a hat and smoking a cigarette – prompted investigators to rummage through police archives and resubmit the single available thumbprint into the Missing and Unidentified Persons System, called NamUs.

They were shocked months later when the FBI's Johnson called to confirm they had matched the thumbprint to prints of Downey taken after an earlier arrest in Texas.

But the fact that this was a homicide and the unusual tattoos – including a skeleton clad in Nazi garb and a cartoon figure wearing a hat and smoking a cigarette – prompted investigators to rummage through police archives and resubmit the single available thumbprint into the Missing and Unidentified Persons System, called NamUs.

They were shocked months later when the FBI's Mr Johnson called to confirm they had matched the thumbprint to prints of Downey taken after an earlier arrest in Texas.

Experts were shocked when the FBI called to confirm they had matched the thumbprint to prints of Downey taken after an earlier arrest in Texas (pictured)Experts were shocked when the FBI called to confirm they had matched the thumbprint to prints of Downey taken after an earlier arrest in Texas (pictured)

Experts were shocked when the FBI called to confirm they had matched the thumbprint to prints of Downey taken after an earlier arrest in Texas (pictured)

About 40 per cent of the identifications through the FBI's new process have been cases in Arizona.

Most are people who died while attempting to make the dangerous desert crossing from Mexico.

Bruce Anderson, the forensic anthropologist for Pima County, Arizona, keeps more than 1,000 unidentified person charts filed along his office wall.

This late 1950s photo provided by the Downey family shows John Downey, far left, posing for a photo with siblings in Rogers, TexasThis late 1950s photo provided by the Downey family shows John Downey, far left, posing for a photo with siblings in Rogers, Texas

This late 1950s photo provided by the Downey family shows John Downey, far left, posing for a photo with siblings in Rogers, Texas

'If you can remove one of these charts, have one family reach out to you to confirm an identity, some of that weight on us is removed,' Mr Anderson said.

Aden Naka, assistant director for forensics investigation in New York City, said many of the new identifications there were of bodies found in water, with some dating back to the early 1990s.

Once they had a match, Mr Naka said, staffers tried to find relatives or aid a criminal investigation if one is open.

'This matters tremendously,' Mr Naka said. 'Everyone deserves a name.'

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Australia

Covid: Brisbane to enter three-day lockdown over single infection

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The Australian city of Brisbane has begun a snap three-day lockdown after a cleaner in its hotel quarantine system became infected with coronavirus.

Health officials said the cleaner had the highly transmissible UK variant and they were afraid it could spread.

Brisbane has seen very few cases of the virus beyond quarantined travellers since Australia’s first wave last year.

It is the first known instance of this variant entering the Australian community outside of hotel quarantine.

The lockdown is for five populous council areas in Queensland’s state capital.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced the measure on Friday morning local time, about 16 hours after the woman tested positive.

Ms Palaszczuk said the lockdown aimed to halt the virus as rapidly as possible, adding: “Doing three days now could avoid doing 30 days in the future.”

“I think everybody in Queensland… knows what we are seeing in the UK and other places around the world is high rates of infection from this particular strain,” she said.

“And we do not want to see that happening here in our great state.”

Australia has reported 28,500 coronavirus infections and 909 deaths since the pandemic began. By contrast, the US, which is the hardest-hit country, has recorded more than 21 million infections while nearly 362,000 people have died of the disease.The lockdown will begin at 18:00 on Friday (08:00 GMT) in the Brisbane city, Logan and the Ipswich, Moreton and Redlands local government areas.

Residents will only be allowed to leave home for certain reasons, such as buying essential items and seeking medical care.

For the first time, residents in those areas will also be required to wear masks outside of their homes.

Australia has faced sporadic outbreaks over the past year, with the most severe one in Melbourne triggering a lockdown for almost four months.

A pre-Christmas outbreak in Sydney caused fresh alarm, but aggressive testing and contact-tracing has kept infection numbers low. The city recorded four local cases on Friday.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government has pledged to start mass vaccinations in February instead of March as was planned.

Lockdown interrupts ‘near normal’ life in Brisbane

Simon Atkinson, BBC News in Brisbane

At 8:00 today I popped to the local supermarket for some bread, milk – and because it’s summer here – a mango. I was pretty much the only customer.

When I went past the same shop a couple of hours later it was a different story – 50 people standing in the drizzle – queuing to get inside as others emerged with bulging shopping bags. “Heaps busier than Christmas,” a cheery trolley attendant told me. “It’s off the scale”.

Despite the “don’t panic” messages from authorities, pictures on social media show it’s a pattern being repeated across the city.

While shutdowns are common around the world, the tough and sudden stay-at-home order for Brisbane has caught people on the hop here after months of near normality.

But while such a rapid, hard lockdown off the back of just a single case of Covid-19 will seem crazy in some parts of the world, I’ve not come across too many people complaining.

And I don’t think that’s just because Aussies love to follow a rule. This is the first time the UK variant of the virus has been detected in the community in Australia.

And nobody here wants Brisbane to go through what Melbourne suffered last year. Even if it means going without mangoes.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55582836

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Australia

Australia v India: Five touring players in isolation after restaurant visit

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Five India players are isolating as a precaution after a video on social media showed them eating indoors at a Melbourne restaurant.

Rohit Sharma, Rishabh Pant, Shubman Gill, Prithvi Shaw and Navdeep Saini – all part of India’s Test squad to play Australia – will be isolated from other players but are still able to train.

Both teams are investigating to determine whether bio-secure protocols for the tour have been breached.

The third Test begins on 6 January.

The tour is being played with restrictions to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

While in Melbourne, where the recent second Test was played, players and staff are allowed to leave their hotel but if they attend a restaurant they must remain outdoors.

An India supporter posted a video on social media of the five players eating indoors at a restaurant on New Year’s Day.

“The BCCI [Board of Control for Cricket in India] and CA [Cricket Australia] are investigating the matter and seeking to determine whether the outing constitutes a breach of biosecurity protocols,” a Cricket Australia statement said.

“In the interim, on the advice of the Australian and Indian medical teams, the aforementioned players have been placed in isolation as a precaution.

“This will include separating the group of players from the broader Indian and Australian squads when traveling and at the training venue.”

On Monday the teams are due to travel from Melbourne to Sydney for the third Test which will be played at the Sydney Cricket Ground.

No details were given on whether the five players would be able to play in Sydney.

Pant and Gill both played in the second Test, which India won to level the four-Test series, while vice-captain Rohit was expected to play in the third, having recently quarantined for 14 days to join the squad late after injury.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/sport/cricket/55514593

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Australia

Covid: Sydney announces new restrictions ahead of New Year

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Australia has announced new restrictions for Sydney ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations.

The city is battling a worsening outbreak after months of next to no local cases. Officials reported it had grown to 147 cases on Wednesday.

The news comes amid anger over footage of young revellers seen on Sydney’s Bronte Beach on Christmas Day.

Immigration minister Alex Hawke said tourists caught flouting public health restrictions could be deported.

The virus’s re-appearance in Sydney a week before Christmas sparked a swift re-introduction of restrictions in the city, including clampdowns on holiday gatherings and a lockdown of the worst-affected region, the Northern Beaches.

On Wednesday, the New South Wales (NSW) state government announced further restrictions for New Year’s Eve following the discovery of a new cluster in a separate part of the city – believed to have spread during Christmas gatherings.

“We don’t want New Year’s Eve to be the cause of a super-spreader [event],” said NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian.

Households will now be restricted to only five guests from Thursday, down from the previous 10-person limit. Outdoor gathering numbers have also been cut to 30 from 50.

Every other state and territory in Australia maintains a travel ban on people from Sydney.

Sydney’s traditional New Year’s Eve fireworks celebrations will still go ahead but authorities have already banned group gatherings at vantage points around the harbour.

Australia has recorded 909 deaths and about 28,300 cases since the pandemic began – a number far lower than many other rich nations.

 

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55481851

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