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Merkel changes tune on German refugee cap

Merkel made the announcement Monday in a joint news conference with Horst Seehofer, leader of the Ch..

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Merkel made the announcement Monday in a joint news conference with Horst Seehofer, leader of the Christian Social Union — the more conservative sister party to Merkel's Christian Democratic Union — after discussions in which the two parties sought compromises on a number of issues following poor results in the federal elections two weeks ago.The parties have agreed to try and limit the number of refugees arriving in Germany each year to 200,000 — a policy that Seehofer has repeatedly demanded and Merkel had consistently rejected."On the issue of an upper limit, my position is clear," Merkel said in July. "I won't accept one."Nearly three months later, that position has changed. "I'm pleased about the compromise we've found," she said Monday, describing the deal as a "very, very good basis" for the two parties to enter coalition talks next week.

2015 'cannot be repeated'

The new policy is not described as an upper limit ("Obergrenze") and comes with several caveats, but still marks a concession by Merkel to the more conservative forces in her sister party."We will continue our efforts to reduce, sustainably and permanently, the number of people who flee to Germany and Europe, so that a situation like that of 2015 will not and cannot be repeated," reads a joint CSU/CDU position paper published Monday. "We guarantee that."More than a million refugees entered the country in 2015 as a result of Merkel's so-called open-door migration policy, sparking a heated national debate about immigration and integration.Seehofer has strongly criticized Merkel for allowing over a million refugees into Germany in 2015.The 200,000 figure refers to controlled admissions, such as refugees resettled as part of EU programs or under the deal struck between the bloc and Turkey in 2016.Reducing the number of asylum seekers who arrive outside the framework of these programs can be achieved by fighting traffickers, protecting the EU's borders and striking deals with countries of origin and transit, according to the document. Merkel and Seehofer made clear Monday that the figure itself is flexible — the Bundestag can decide to raise or lower it in extreme circumstances — and the fundamental right to seek asylum is guaranteed: People will not be turned away at the borders after the limit is reached.

'Regressive' policies

We can say goodbye to a stable GermanyBut Karl Kopp, director for European affairs at Pro Asyl, a German charity that advocates for refugees, told CNN that any kind of limit is "not compatible with international law" and "totally unacceptable."He's also concerned that a further proposal to house all asylum seekers in "decision and repatriation centers" while their claims are assessed will be detrimental for the integration process and encourage hostility toward refugees. Kopp sees these "regressive" announcements as a direct response to the success of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) in last month's election. The party, which campaigned on an anti-Islam, anti-immigration platform, won 12.6% of the vote and is now the third largest party in Parliament. Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, co-lead candidates of the Alternative for Germany (AfD) celebrate after the announcement of the initial results of the federal election on September 24Across Europe, far-right parties have "hijacked the agenda," Kopp said. Discussions about migration in Germany are now "inspired by the right wing and the AfD. It's a poisoned debate."On the night of the election, Merkel described the AfD's success as a "big new challenge" and said she wanted to "win back AfD voters." This new position may be an attempt to do just that. Although Merkel's party won the biggest share of the vote in the country's federal elections two weeks ago — propelling her to a fourth term in office — support for her party fell by 8.6 percentage points, with many voters turning to the AfD instead.It is unclear whether this move will encourage those voters to shift their allegiance back to the CDU, but it is likely to cause problems for Merkel during coalition discussions. The Green party is committed to fighting any kind of limit on refugee numbers and reiterated that position Sunday night.In a post on Twitter, Simone Peter, co-leader of the party, insisted there was no difference between this agreement and Seehofer's earlier demands for an "Obergrenze.""And where is the difference with an upper limit?" Peter wrote. "Number is totally arbitrary, determined purely ideologically. For us it's the basic right to asylum that matters!"

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Ursula von der Leyen offers speedy response to Ukraine’s bid to join EU

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European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said the civilian deaths in the Ukrainian town of Bucha showed the “cruel face” of Russia’s army and pledged to try to speed Ukraine’s bid to become a member of the European Union.

During a visit to Bucha on Friday, where forensic investigators started to exhume bodies from a mass grave, Von der Leyen looked visibly moved by what she saw in the town northwest of Kyiv where Ukrainian officials say hundreds of civilians were killed by Russian forces.

Russia denies targeting civilians and has called the allegations that Russian forces executed civilians in Bucha while they occupied the town a “monstrous forgery”.

As EU officials were about to arrive in Kyiv, at least 50 people were killed and many more wounded in a missile strike at a railway station packed with civilians fleeing the threat of a major Russian offensive in eastern Ukraine.

At a news conference, Von der Leyen condemned what she called “the cynical behaviour” of those who wrote “for our children” on the weapons found near the scene.

Saying the EU could never match the sacrifice of Ukraine, Von der Leyen offered it a speedier start to its bid for bloc membership.

Handing the president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, a questionnaire which will form a starting point for a decision on membership, she said: “It will not as usual be a matter of years to form this opinion but I think a matter of weeks.”

Zelenskiy told the same news conference he would come back with answers in a week.

“Russia will descend into economic, financial and technological decay, while Ukraine is marching towards the European future, this is what I see,” Von der Leyen said.

Earlier in Bucha, she told reporters: “The unthinkable has happened here. We have seen the cruel face of Putin’s army. We have seen the recklessness and the cold-heartedness with which they have been occupying the city.”

Von der Leyen’s trip to Kyiv was aimed at offering Zelenskiy moral and some financial support.

She pledged her support for Ukraine to “emerge from the war as a democratic country”, something, she said, the European Union and other donors would help with.

Josep Borrell, the EU’s chief diplomat, said he hoped the EU could allocate a further €500m (£420m) to Ukraine for arms purchases in a couple of days.

Zelenskiy has urged Brussels to do more to punish Russia, including banning purchases of Russian oil and gas, and has called on the EU to accept Ukraine as a full member.

Earlier, Borrell said oil sanctions were “a big elephant in the room“, with some concerns that a move to cut out Russian crude could cause a spike in prices that would be painful to European economies. He said a decision on exports would be raised on Monday in Brussels.

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Dutch officials drop case against Rijksmuseum over ‘racist’ word

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The director of the Rijksmuseum said he was “happy” as Dutch prosecutors announced they would not proceed with an investigation into complaints over a newly opened exhibition on Indonesian independence, the first of its kind in Europe.

The exhibition, Revolusi! Indonesia Independent, at the Netherlands’ national museum, has been a source a controversy since one of its curators, Bonnie Triyana, said the term “bersiap”, or stand by, would not be used in reference to the violent upheaval that followed a declaration of independence from the Dutch state.

Triyana claimed that use of the word, a battle cry for young Indonesians seeking independence, “takes on a strongly racist connotation” in the Netherlands today that “always portrays primitive, uncivilised Indonesians as perpetrators of the violence”. He said: “The team of curators has decided not to use the word bersiap as a common term referring to the violent period in Indonesia.”

In a sign of the ongoing sensitivity in Dutch society over the country’s colonial history, the comments drew a furious response in some quarters, with the head of the Federation of Dutch Indonesians, Hans Moll, accusing the Rijksmuseum of genocide denial by ignoring that “thousands of Dutch people were brutally tortured, raped and murdered by Indonesians because of their Dutch or European ethnicity”.

Complaints were made to the general prosecutor last month but Taco Dibbits, the Rijksmuseum’s director, said he had learned on the eve of the exhibition’s opening on Thursday that the justice ministry would not be proceeding with the case.

“I’m happy and had expected the decision that the case is not viable,” he said. “But I think it is very good that there is discussion about these concepts. It is our duty to broaden our view of history.”

Dibbits said the exhibition did make reference to the term bersiap but put it in the context of violence endured by a large range of people, and that the show explored the entire period from 1945 to 27 December 1949 when the Dutch withdrew.

He said: “The term ‘bersiap’ is used in the Netherlands by different communities that had to flee Indonesia and were repatriated during the revolution. It marks a very specific moment in time in the four and a half years of the revolution, the moment of the fall of 1945, when Indonesia has just declared itself independent and groups of insurgents executed extreme violence against several groups: Indo-Europeans, Moluccans on the Dutch side, and Chinese and others they thought were on the Dutch side. It takes place in the chaos just after the declaration of independence.

“We explain the source of the word, which started to be used in the Netherlands in the 1980s, and give it a historical context, but also speak about the violence against other groups during the revolution. We speak about violence in a much broader sense.”

Dibbits said he felt it was a “pity” that complaints had been made to the prosectors before the exhibition had opened. A second complaint, which is also not being pursued, was filed with prosecutors after Dibbits clarified before the opening that the bersiap concept would be referenced.

Dibbits said: “One claimed that not using the term was against history and the second complaint said the using of the term was against history.”

Indonesia became a member of the United Nations in 1950 and today the country counts about 270 million inhabitants across more than 17,000 islands.

The exhibition explores the personal stories of independence fighters, artists, diplomats, politicians, journalists and those seeking to maintain Dutch hold over the territory by displaying more than 200 objects, including privately owned keepsakes and paintings.

Dibbits said among the most powerful artefacts was a bundle of baby clothes made out of book covers, belonging to a young woman called Julia Nelisse. She had given birth to a daughter, Merani, in a leper colony in Pelantungan, modern-day Java, on 6 September 1947.

Corpses of fighters and civilians were regularly washing up on the river shore, which Nelisse laid out on cloth shrouds. Due to the lack of remaining cloth, she had to take the covers from books in the abandoned colony library to make into clothes. On show is a vest, a pillow and a nappy. “It is very emotional to see and brings it very close,” Dibbits said.

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Heidelberg shooting: One dead in gun attack on German students

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A lone gunman has killed one person and seriously injured three others inside a lecture hall at Heidelberg University in the south-west of Germany, before shooting himself dead.

He was an 18-year-old German student.

German police said the shooter, who was armed with two guns, had used a “long gun”, and fired shots around the amphitheatre “wildly”.

The bloodshed triggered a large operation at the university’s campus in the Neuenheimer Feld area.

Police asked people to avoid the area so rescue workers and emergency services could move around freely.

German media reported that the gunman appeared to have no religious or political motive.

Police have searched his flat in the city of Mannheim, and found a WhatsApp message he had sent shortly beforehand, in which he spoke of punishing people.

Heidelberg is a university town with about 160,000 inhabitants.

The country has some of the strictest gun laws in Europe, and school shootings are rare. Anyone under 25 is required to pass a psychological evaluation before getting a gun licence.

Police initially said four victims had been wounded, with a later update confirming one had died in hospital.

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