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Qatar’s new Active Diplomacy of Human Rights

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The Madrid Journals News – The Arab gulf siege imposed on Qatar has resulted in active diplomacy. Qatar seems to face for armies of Diplomats, international relations, think-tank institutes and policy centers.  Add to this, the countries imposing the siege are paying top US and UK lobbyists in hope of steering their county’s policy against Qatar. Since the begging of the siege, Qatar’s diplomacy has been active worldwide in an attempt to resist the efforts of those countries.

The International public opinion seems to support Qatar for the simple reason that they hate Saudi Arabia and its human rights records. The Qatari diplomacy seems to employ human rights to get the support of public opinion.

  

Seemingly, the Diplomacy of human rights don’t come from Qatari Government, rather they are by a local human rights organization known as the Qatar National Human Rights Committee (NHRC). This committee has been in the forefront since the beginning of the Saudi-UAE led siege.

NHRC held dozens of workshops, conferences and seminars with organizations and politicians worldwide. It has met with dozens of politicians and decision makers across the world to explain the ramifications of the siege and current human rights conditions in the country including the rights of migrant workers and the reported human rights abuses. The committee has made public statements in which it called on the Qatari Government to improve the conditions of migrant workers.

The committee which is independent in its work and projects is headed by a Qatari national named Ali Bin Samikh Al Marri. Dr. Ali Al-Marri was elected as the president of the Arab Commission for human rights at the League of Arab states in 2012. Also, he was elected as the chairperson of the Asia Pacific forum (APF) for the period 2013-2015. The Diplomacy of Al Marri made the siege of Qatar a title on various newspapers and TVs worldwide. He provides new discourse not about the Rich Qatar but the oppressed Qatar which lives in siege and human suffering.

Recently, NHRC visited the UK and held dozens of meetings with a number of UK parliamentarians including members of the House of Lords and the House of Commons. The meetings discussed the work of the committee and future cooperation.

Meetings were held with Tom Brake MP and Alistair Carmichael MP from the Liberal Democrats Party as well as Baroness Udin and Lord Norman Warner from the House of Lords.

The two-day visit to the UK included also meetings with members of the commons such as Chris Williamson MP, and David Wayne MP, and Grahame Morris MP, Richard Burden from the Labour Party.

Meanwhile, Tommy Sheppard MP, for the SNP Party hosted a meeting where the Qatar NHRC President, Dr. Ali  Al-Marri spoke on the achievement and work of the committee.

According to the organization, NHRC was re-organized in accordance with Decree law no. (17) for the year 2010, thereby consolidating NHRC independence as a permanent official body headquartered in the city of Doha with a separate legal personality and an independent budget; this Decree also specified the objectives and mandates of the NHRC.

At the international level, the NHRC was accredited A status by the International Coordinating Committee of National Human Rights Institutions for the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights (ICC) which is a representative body of national human rights institutions drawn from all regions of the world; the NHRC is also a member in the Sub-Committee on Accreditation (SCA) of the International Coordinating Committee (ICC) which is responsible for the  accreditation and classification of national Committees all over the world.

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Europe

Ursula von der Leyen offers speedy response to Ukraine’s bid to join EU

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European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said the civilian deaths in the Ukrainian town of Bucha showed the “cruel face” of Russia’s army and pledged to try to speed Ukraine’s bid to become a member of the European Union.

During a visit to Bucha on Friday, where forensic investigators started to exhume bodies from a mass grave, Von der Leyen looked visibly moved by what she saw in the town northwest of Kyiv where Ukrainian officials say hundreds of civilians were killed by Russian forces.

Russia denies targeting civilians and has called the allegations that Russian forces executed civilians in Bucha while they occupied the town a “monstrous forgery”.

As EU officials were about to arrive in Kyiv, at least 50 people were killed and many more wounded in a missile strike at a railway station packed with civilians fleeing the threat of a major Russian offensive in eastern Ukraine.

At a news conference, Von der Leyen condemned what she called “the cynical behaviour” of those who wrote “for our children” on the weapons found near the scene.

Saying the EU could never match the sacrifice of Ukraine, Von der Leyen offered it a speedier start to its bid for bloc membership.

Handing the president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, a questionnaire which will form a starting point for a decision on membership, she said: “It will not as usual be a matter of years to form this opinion but I think a matter of weeks.”

Zelenskiy told the same news conference he would come back with answers in a week.

“Russia will descend into economic, financial and technological decay, while Ukraine is marching towards the European future, this is what I see,” Von der Leyen said.

Earlier in Bucha, she told reporters: “The unthinkable has happened here. We have seen the cruel face of Putin’s army. We have seen the recklessness and the cold-heartedness with which they have been occupying the city.”

Von der Leyen’s trip to Kyiv was aimed at offering Zelenskiy moral and some financial support.

She pledged her support for Ukraine to “emerge from the war as a democratic country”, something, she said, the European Union and other donors would help with.

Josep Borrell, the EU’s chief diplomat, said he hoped the EU could allocate a further €500m (£420m) to Ukraine for arms purchases in a couple of days.

Zelenskiy has urged Brussels to do more to punish Russia, including banning purchases of Russian oil and gas, and has called on the EU to accept Ukraine as a full member.

Earlier, Borrell said oil sanctions were “a big elephant in the room“, with some concerns that a move to cut out Russian crude could cause a spike in prices that would be painful to European economies. He said a decision on exports would be raised on Monday in Brussels.

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Dutch officials drop case against Rijksmuseum over ‘racist’ word

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The director of the Rijksmuseum said he was “happy” as Dutch prosecutors announced they would not proceed with an investigation into complaints over a newly opened exhibition on Indonesian independence, the first of its kind in Europe.

The exhibition, Revolusi! Indonesia Independent, at the Netherlands’ national museum, has been a source a controversy since one of its curators, Bonnie Triyana, said the term “bersiap”, or stand by, would not be used in reference to the violent upheaval that followed a declaration of independence from the Dutch state.

Triyana claimed that use of the word, a battle cry for young Indonesians seeking independence, “takes on a strongly racist connotation” in the Netherlands today that “always portrays primitive, uncivilised Indonesians as perpetrators of the violence”. He said: “The team of curators has decided not to use the word bersiap as a common term referring to the violent period in Indonesia.”

In a sign of the ongoing sensitivity in Dutch society over the country’s colonial history, the comments drew a furious response in some quarters, with the head of the Federation of Dutch Indonesians, Hans Moll, accusing the Rijksmuseum of genocide denial by ignoring that “thousands of Dutch people were brutally tortured, raped and murdered by Indonesians because of their Dutch or European ethnicity”.

Complaints were made to the general prosecutor last month but Taco Dibbits, the Rijksmuseum’s director, said he had learned on the eve of the exhibition’s opening on Thursday that the justice ministry would not be proceeding with the case.

“I’m happy and had expected the decision that the case is not viable,” he said. “But I think it is very good that there is discussion about these concepts. It is our duty to broaden our view of history.”

Dibbits said the exhibition did make reference to the term bersiap but put it in the context of violence endured by a large range of people, and that the show explored the entire period from 1945 to 27 December 1949 when the Dutch withdrew.

He said: “The term ‘bersiap’ is used in the Netherlands by different communities that had to flee Indonesia and were repatriated during the revolution. It marks a very specific moment in time in the four and a half years of the revolution, the moment of the fall of 1945, when Indonesia has just declared itself independent and groups of insurgents executed extreme violence against several groups: Indo-Europeans, Moluccans on the Dutch side, and Chinese and others they thought were on the Dutch side. It takes place in the chaos just after the declaration of independence.

“We explain the source of the word, which started to be used in the Netherlands in the 1980s, and give it a historical context, but also speak about the violence against other groups during the revolution. We speak about violence in a much broader sense.”

Dibbits said he felt it was a “pity” that complaints had been made to the prosectors before the exhibition had opened. A second complaint, which is also not being pursued, was filed with prosecutors after Dibbits clarified before the opening that the bersiap concept would be referenced.

Dibbits said: “One claimed that not using the term was against history and the second complaint said the using of the term was against history.”

Indonesia became a member of the United Nations in 1950 and today the country counts about 270 million inhabitants across more than 17,000 islands.

The exhibition explores the personal stories of independence fighters, artists, diplomats, politicians, journalists and those seeking to maintain Dutch hold over the territory by displaying more than 200 objects, including privately owned keepsakes and paintings.

Dibbits said among the most powerful artefacts was a bundle of baby clothes made out of book covers, belonging to a young woman called Julia Nelisse. She had given birth to a daughter, Merani, in a leper colony in Pelantungan, modern-day Java, on 6 September 1947.

Corpses of fighters and civilians were regularly washing up on the river shore, which Nelisse laid out on cloth shrouds. Due to the lack of remaining cloth, she had to take the covers from books in the abandoned colony library to make into clothes. On show is a vest, a pillow and a nappy. “It is very emotional to see and brings it very close,” Dibbits said.

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Heidelberg shooting: One dead in gun attack on German students

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A lone gunman has killed one person and seriously injured three others inside a lecture hall at Heidelberg University in the south-west of Germany, before shooting himself dead.

He was an 18-year-old German student.

German police said the shooter, who was armed with two guns, had used a “long gun”, and fired shots around the amphitheatre “wildly”.

The bloodshed triggered a large operation at the university’s campus in the Neuenheimer Feld area.

Police asked people to avoid the area so rescue workers and emergency services could move around freely.

German media reported that the gunman appeared to have no religious or political motive.

Police have searched his flat in the city of Mannheim, and found a WhatsApp message he had sent shortly beforehand, in which he spoke of punishing people.

Heidelberg is a university town with about 160,000 inhabitants.

The country has some of the strictest gun laws in Europe, and school shootings are rare. Anyone under 25 is required to pass a psychological evaluation before getting a gun licence.

Police initially said four victims had been wounded, with a later update confirming one had died in hospital.

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