Australia

Sheikh sacked for saying women need hijabs to ward off men

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  • Muslim sheikh Zainadine Johnson says women need to wear hijabs to repel men
  • Founder of Logan City Mosque pointed to Hollywood sex scandals to make case
  • Queensland Islam-convert also urged women to refrain from wearing bracelets
  • He has told his Facebook followers he was sacked as a result of a video sermon

By Stephen Johnson For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 08:30 EST, 12 November 2017 | Updated: 09:23 EST, 12 November 2017

A hardline Islamic sheikh has been sacked from his day job for telling his followers women need to wear the hijab so men can control their sexual urges.

Queensland Muslim leader Sheikh Zainadine Johnson was weighing into claims made against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein when he advised women on the need to cover up.

'Men should be able to control themselves. This is a common argument against the Islamic hijab,' he told his Facebook followers.

'I totally agree, they should be able to control themselves, however facts show many don't, this is why a hijab is necessary for women.'

The Sunni founder of the Logan City Mosque, south of Brisbane, was sacked from his undisclosed job six days after Daily Mail Australia broke the story.

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Hardline Logan-based Sunni imam Sheikh Zaindine Johnson said hijabs help ward off men

Hardline Logan-based Sunni imam Sheikh Zaindine Johnson said hijabs help ward off men

'I was good until you called. They sacked me because of your article,' he told Daily Mail Australia on Sunday night. 'Look, I don't really want to talk to you.'

Sheikh Johnson described his sacking as a freedom of speech issue.

'Do we really have freedom of religion? Do we really have freedom of speech?,' he asked his 4,923 Facebook friends.

'Should they be permitted by law to fire me based on speaking my beliefs?'

The Islam convert said he was 'fired immediately' after several work colleagues had read the Daily Mail Australia story on November 5.

The Muslim convert preacher used sex scandals involving Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein (pictured) to illustrate how men can't control their sexual urgesThe Muslim convert preacher used sex scandals involving Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein (pictured) to illustrate how men can't control their sexual urges

The Muslim convert preacher used sex scandals involving Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein (pictured) to illustrate how men can't control their sexual urges

'People insult my religion day in and day out to the point where pornographic videos were made insulting my Prophet and it is freedom of speech,' he said.

'However if I speak something I believe from my religion on my own Facebook to my friends I am fired.'

Sheikh Johnson said he had 'secretly worked' in a high-profile state emergency services job 'helping the people of Queensland, saving children's lives every day'.

But he had declined to name the company to avoid anti-Islam groups attempting to defame his employer.

Hardline Sunni imam Sheikh Zainadine Johnson says his sacking is a freedom of speech issueHardline Sunni imam Sheikh Zainadine Johnson says his sacking is a freedom of speech issue

Hardline Sunni imam Sheikh Zainadine Johnson says his sacking is a freedom of speech issue

The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services said it had no record of him working there.

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The Muslim-convert and Sharia law advocate, who used to play in a band, had also used his sermon to urge women to avoid wearing bracelets out in public.

'There's no problem with a female wearing a gold bracelet and making herself look beautiful as long as it's underneath her hijab or at home, no problem,' he said.

'In front of her husband, no problem. But on the streets wearing it? No.

'In front of the people, this is not what's permissible.'

Sheikh Johnson's argument linking the hijab with keeping at bay the sexual urges of men has echoes of controversial remarks by former western Sydney-based grand mufti Sheikh Taj el Din al-Hilaly, who in 2006 described women who don't wear the hijab as 'uncovered meat'.

The imam told his followers women needed to wear a hijab so men could control themselvesThe imam told his followers women needed to wear a hijab so men could control themselves

The imam told his followers women needed to wear a hijab so men could control themselves

Former grand mufti Sheikh Taj el-Din al Hilaly in 2006 likened women to 'uncovered meat'Former grand mufti Sheikh Taj el-Din al Hilaly in 2006 likened women to 'uncovered meat'

Former grand mufti Sheikh Taj el-Din al Hilaly in 2006 likened women to 'uncovered meat'

Sheikh el-Din al-Hilaly told 500 worshipers in September 2006 that women were asking for attention when they failed to cover up their flesh with a hijab.

'If you take out uncovered meat and place it outside on the street, or in the garden or in the park, or in the backyard without a cover, and the cats come and eat it … whose fault is it, the cats or the uncovered meat?,' he asked.

'The uncovered meat is the problem.'

His remarks were condemned at the time by other Muslim leaders and then prime minister John Howard as 'appalling and reprehensible'.

Sheikh Zaindine Johnson says women can help men control their urges by covering upSheikh Zaindine Johnson says women can help men control their urges by covering up

Sheikh Zaindine Johnson says women can help men control their urges by covering up

The surfer turned imam is also urging women to avoid wearing bracelets out on the streetsThe surfer turned imam is also urging women to avoid wearing bracelets out on the streets

The surfer turned imam is also urging women to avoid wearing bracelets out on the streets

Sheikh Johnson, a surfer and former bass guitarist with Brisbane rock band Grinder, used his latest sermon to urge Muslim men to avoid also wearing bracelets.

The hardline Sunni used the Arabic term for sinful, haram, to denounce the idea of men putting on metal, bodily decorations.

'For men, on the other hand, bracelets are haram. Why are bracelets haram?,' he asked.

'Because it is copying the females. Bracelets, necklaces, earrings, nose rings, eye rings, whatever rings.'

Sheikh Johnson, who grew up on the Sunshine Coast, has recently urged Muslims to refrain from celebrating Christmas and in August described as sexual harassment the idea of shaking hands with women.

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