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SALES LEADS LATAM: AkzoNobel, Molinos Rio de la Plata, Air Canada…

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clien..

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A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clients are moving into the market and/or targeting Latin American consumers right now.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada's new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact Sales Manager Daniela Landa at [email protected]

For prior Sales Leads LatAm editions, click here.

MediaCom Argentina has won decorative paints AkzoNobel global account. The agency will be responsible for strategic planning and media buying for Argentina, South Africa, the Middle East and North Africa. AkzoNobel is the holding company of decoration brands such as Alba, Dulux, Sikkens, International, Interpon and Eka.

  • Molinos Rio de la Plata

Molinos Rio de la Plata has chosen Havas Group to manage the digital platforms that operate on Google and programmatic buying. The platforms will be operated under the specialized units: Ecselis (Google) and Affiperf (programmatic). The agency also handles media buying & planning for the brand globally.

  • Air Canada

The arrival of flight AC1942 at Lima's Jorge Chávez International Airport marks the successful launch Air Canada's non-stop service between Montreal and Lima, Peru, Montreal's first year-round link to the southern hemisphere. The twice weekly flights will be operated by Air Canada Rouge with 282-seat Boeing 767-300ER aircraft featuring Premium Rouge and Economy class service.This new route will complement the airline existing flights from Toronto, and strategically position Air Canada as an important player in the growing market between Montrealand Latin America. South America will be the third new continent Air Canada serves from Montreal in two years.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada's new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact Sales Manager Daniela Landa at [email protected]

  • Xpress Money

In line with its focus to increase its network in Latin America, Xpress Money, a global money transfer Brand, has partnered with Confidence Corretora De Câmbio S.A., a renowned company in Brazil that offers various solutions for individuals to buy foreign currency, exchange international checks, pay bills abroad, and send and receive money from abroad. With this partnership, Xpress Money now has a strong network of over 50,000 locations in LATAM. Remittance inflows to Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) was US$73 billion in 2016, an increase of an estimated 6.9 percent as compared to the previous year (Source: World Bank). This shows the huge remittance growth potential that the region has to offer to brands looking to strengthen their presence in the region.

  • Little Caesars® Pizza

Little Caesars® Pizza, a global pizza chain, announced expansion plans in Central and South America. Only a few months after Little Caesars® opened its first restaurant in Chile, the pizza chain will open two restaurants in Nicaragua and one in Peru. The restaurants will begin operations during the first week of December in both countries, with a second Nicaraguan restaurant scheduled to open in January 2018.Known throughout the world for its innovative HOT-N-READY® model that offers pizza hot out of the oven, without calling ahead or waiting in line, Little Caesars will be bringing best-in-class quality, value and convenience to pizza lovers in Nicaragua and Peru.The Latin American pizza industry is projected to grow by as much as 45.15% between 2015 and 2017, according to the 2017 Pizza Power Report by PMQ Pizza Magazine, outpacing Europe, North America and Asia Pacific combined. Little Caesars continued success and growth in the region reflects a strategic global expansion strategy for the established brand and its franchisees.

NEW FEATURES TO PORTADA'S INTERACTIVE DATABASES
We have incorporated new features to the interactive database of corporate marketers and agency executives targeting LatAm consumers:
New Leads: Weekly more than 20 new leads uploaded to the Database by the Portada team as well as the contacts related to the above weekly Sales Leads column written by our editorial team.
Download the Database: Download the full Database in Excel Format.
Search Database: You can search through a user-friendly interactive Interface: Search Fields include: Name, Company/Agency, Job – Title, Address, Zip, E-mail, Accounts (Agency), Phone, Related News.

Celeste Martorana @celesmartorana

Celeste joined Portada’s team in 2014. Since then, she has been working as an editor for Portada’s English-language website and compiling information for Portada’s Databases.

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Latin America

Three abducted Catholic clergy released in Haiti

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Three members of the Catholic clergy kidnapped in Haiti earlier month this have been released, officials say.

But seven other people – including a French nun and a French priest – abducted in the town of Croix-des-Bouquets remain in captivity.

The kidnappers had demanded $1m (£722,000) as a ransom payment after they seized the group on 11 April.

Haiti’s President Jovenel Moïse has vowed to “do everything the law allows” to secure their release.

“Three of the seven clergy kidnapped on April 11 were released,” Father Loudger Mazile, spokesman for the Bishop’s Conference of the island nation, told the AFP on Thursday.

“The French were not released. There were no lay people among those released,” he said.

It is not known whether any ransom has been paid.

The attack happened when the Catholic clergy were on their way to the installation of a new parish priest.

A police source told AFP that a gang calling itself 400 Mazowo was most probably behind the abduction.

Kidnappings have surged in Haiti, with the Catholic Church describing the situation as “a descent into hell”.

While at first well-off business people were the main targets, victims have come from all walks of life. Religious groups have not been spared.

On 1 April, armed men burst into a service at an evangelical church on the outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and abducted the pastor and three other people. The service was being live-streamed on social media at the time.

The four were released three days later after an undisclosed sum was paid in ransom but the brazenness of kidnapping a pastor in the middle of a service shocked many Haitians.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-56854273

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Latin America

Coronavirus: What’s behind Latin America’s oxygen shortages?

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Before the clinic ran out of oxygen, Maria Auxiliadora da Cruz had been showing encouraging signs of progress against Covid-19. On 14 January, her oxygen levels had been above the normal level of 95% but, within hours of being deprived of that vital resource, her stats plummeted to 35%.

At this point, patients would normally be given intubation and oxygen by machine. Instead, the 67-year-old retired nurse died. “It was horrible,” her grieving daughter-in-law Thalita Rocha told the BBC. “It was a catastrophe. Many elderly patients began to deteriorate and turn blue.”

In an emotional video that went viral on social media, she described what was happening at Policlínica Redenção in the northern Brazilian city of Manaus. “We’re in a desperate situation. An entire emergency unit has simply run out of oxygen… A lot of people are dying.”

Brazil has the world’s second-highest Covid death toll with more than 221,000 fatalities. In Manaus, the health system has collapsed twice during the pandemic and deaths doubled between December and January.

Now there are fears the lack of oxygen supplies seen there could unfold elsewhere in Brazil and even in other parts of Latin America, where a second wave of Covid-19, in many countries, is proving to be worse than the first one.

In Peru, some hospitals have been unable to meet the demand brought by a steep rise in cases in recent weeks. As a result, patients’ relatives have had to hunt for oxygen in the black market. In some cases, they come back with nothing.

A black market is also thriving in Mexico, where more than 155,000 have died in the pandemic. To make things worse, there have been reports of thieves taking oxygen cylinders from hospitals and clinics.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) one in five Covid-19 patients will require oxygen. In severe cases, this rises to three in five. The organisation says some hospitals have seen demand for oxygen increase between five and seven times above normal levels because of the influx of patients with severe and critical disease.

The most dramatic situation in the world is in Brazil, where nearly 340,000 oxygen cylinders are needed every day, according to the Covid-19 Oxygen Needs tracker. The online tool helps estimate the scale of the challenge for policymakers and was developed by the Covid-19 Respiratory Care Response Coordination partnership which includes Path and Every Breath Counts.

Also according to the tracker, Mexico and Colombia each need more than 100,000 cylinders daily.

So how does a hospital run out of oxygen?

Oxygen has been considered an essential medicine by the WHO since 2017, but Lisa Smith, from Path’s market dynamics program, says ensuring adequate supply depends on many “components” falling into place.

This includes not only sources of production, but also training to enable medical staff to monitor and manage oxygen levels.1px transparent line

Medical oxygen is produced in large quantities at plants and delivered to hospitals in two ways: either in bulk in liquid tanks or as pressurised gas in cylinders containing smaller volumes.

Liquid oxygen is the cheapest and best technology available but it requires hospitals to have the right infrastructure to pipe oxygen to the patient’s bedside. This is common in developed countries such as the US and those in Europe.

Cylinders do not require pipes and can be delivered to clinics without a sophisticated infrastructure. However, their distribution on a smaller scale means they are less cost-effective, in addition to being cumbersome to transport and handle, which also carries an increased risk of cross-contamination.

Another source of production is on-site oxygen plants, which produce oxygen to be piped or compressed into cylinders. The WHO says it is currently trying to map how many such plants exist in the countries.

After Manaus reached crisis point, oxygen donations were sent from the federal government and other states – as the local providers said they were unable to increase production – and across the border from Venezuela. But even transporting them became a problem.

Jesem Orellana, an epidemiologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, said the risk of shortage continued and was exacerbated by global demand.

According to Path, medical oxygen accounts for just 5-10% of the world’s oxygen production. The rest is used in various industries, such as mining, chemical and pharmaceutical.

“We need to think about oxygen as much as we think about electricity, water or other essential utilities,” says Ms Smith. “This can’t be something that we’re only concerned about when it’s bad, because when it’s bad, people will die.”

In the meantime, there are concerns that the strain of Covid-19 on oxygen supplies could have a knock-on effect for the treatment of other diseases.

“Covid has shown us just how essential it is in countries where there is no vaccine against Covid, no medicines,” says Leith Greenslade, who leads the Every Breath Counts Coalition. “Often, it’s down to whether you get oxygen or not, whether you live or die.”

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-55829424

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Latin America

Honduran abortion law: Congress moves to set total ban ‘in stone’

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Parliament in Honduras has initially approved a bill that will make it virtually impossible to legalise abortion in the country.

The new measure will require at least three-quarters of Congress to vote in favour of modifying the abortion law, which is among the strictest in world.

Honduras forbids abortion under any circumstance, even rape or incest.

Its latest move comes in response to Argentina legalising abortion last month.

Across Latin America, there has been increased pro-choice campaigning, known as the “green wave”, based on the colour worn by protesters.

The new legislation in Honduras hinges on an article in the constitution that gives a fetus the same legal status of a person. Constitutional changes have until now been permitted with a two-thirds majority, but the new legislation raises that bar to three-quarters within the 128-member body.

The measure still needs to be ratified by a second vote. However, support was clear on Thursday: with 88 legislators voting in favour, 28 opposed and seven abstentions.

Honduras has a stanchly conservative majority, which referred to the measure as a “shield against abortion”.

“What they did was set this article in stone because we can never reform it if 96 votes are needed [out of 128]”, opposition MP Doris Gutiérrez told AFP news agency.

Mario Pérez, a lawmaker with the ruling party of President Juan Orlando Hernandez, formally proposed the change last week, calling it a “constitutional lock” to prevent any future moderations of the abortion law.

“Every human being has the right to life from the moment of conception,” said Mr Pérez.

Ahead of the vote, UN human rights experts condemned the move, saying in a statement: “This bill is alarming. Instead of taking a step towards fulfilling the fundamental rights of women and girls, the country is moving backwards.”

Abortion has been constitutionally banned in Honduras since 1982.

In 2017, lawmakers voted on decriminalising it in the case of rape, incest or when there was danger to the mother or the fetus, but the move was roundly rejected.

Nicaragua, El Salvador and Haiti also have complete bans on abortion, but Honduras is the only country to also prohibit the use of emergency contraceptives in all cases, including after rape.

Cuba, Uruguay, Guyana and Argentina are the only Latin American countries to permit abortion in the first weeks of pregnancy.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-55764195

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