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Latin America

SALES LEADS LATAM: Mastercard, Beiersdorf, Nissan Brazil…

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clien..

Published

on

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clients are moving into the market and/or targeting Latin American consumers right now.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada's new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at [email protected]

For prior Sales Leads LatAm editions, click here.

  • Mastercard

Mastercard announced the launch of its Start Something Priceless campaign in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). For the first time in history, a brand brings together two football superstars of Latin America, Lionel Messi and Neymar da Silva Santos Jr. (Messi and Neymar Jr.), in an integrated marketing and communications platform to score against childhood hunger and malnutrition in LAC.The social movement, #JuntosSomos10 (TogetherWeAre10), will ignite the evolution of Mastercards iconic Priceless advertising campaign, transforming it from StoryTelling to StoryInspiring, appealing to todays socially engaged consumers.As part of their two-year partnership with Mastercard, Messi and Neymar Jr. will seek to inspire fans to join them in fighting childhood hunger and malnutrition through a series of cause-related marketing efforts supporting the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and other partners which will be incorporated into the movement over time.The campaign kicks-off on April 10th with the activation of the #TogetherWeAre10 social movement, encouraging consumers to join Mastercard in doing their part to make a difference in the world.Along the 2-year campaign, Mastercard aspires to have made a positive impact in the lives of children in the region by providing more than 10 million meals and supporting the fight against malnutrition across LAC. "Human connections are the foundation of the Latin culture,” says Ana Ferrell, Senior Vice President, Marketing and Communications, Mastercard LAC and Portada Council of the Americas member.

  • Beiersdorf

Dentsu Aegis Network Argentina has been awarded beauty and skin care brand Beiersdorf account. The agency will handle strategy development, planning and online and offline media buying for all of its brands, including Nivea, Eucerin and Curitas.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada's new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at [email protected]

  • Nissan Brazil

Nissan Industrial Complex in Resende, Brazil, has achieved the milestone of 30,000 cars made for overseas markets. The timing coincides with the second anniversary of the plants export program, which is exponentially growing due to an increased demand in Latin America.This is in part due to the success of Nissan Kicks as the ultimate addition to the brands export portfolio. Since December, the Argentinian market started to sell the crossover produced at the Resende Industrial Complex. Argentina had already been receiving the March hatchback and the Versa sedan from Brazils plant. Both models made in Brazil are also sold in Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay.

W.L. Gore & Associates has consolidated its global media business for its fabric division with Dentsu Aegis Network following a review, Adweek has reported.Dentsus Gravity, Carat and Amnet agencies will work with Gore-Tex—used in brand products from Adidas, Oakley, Patagonia, Converse and The North Face—across the Americas, Europe and Asia-Pacific.W.L. Gore & Associates Gore-Tex spent US$1.5 million on marketing efforts in the U.S. last year, according to Kantar Media.

NEW FEATURES TO PORTADA'S INTERACTIVE DATABASES
We have incorporated new features to the interactive database of corporate marketers and agency executives targeting LatAm consumers:
New Leads: Weekly more than 20 new leads uploaded to the Database by the Portada team as well as the contacts related to the above weekly Sales Leads column written by our editorial team.
Download the Database: Download the full Database in Excel Format.
Search Database: You can search through a user-friendly interactive Interface: Search Fields include: Name, Company/Agency, Job – Title, Address, Zip, E-mail, Accounts (Agency), Phone, Related News.

Celeste Martorana @celesmartorana

Celeste joined Portadas team in 2014. Since then, she has been working as an editor for Portadas English-language website and compiling information for Portadas Databases.

Original Article

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Latin America

Nicaragua opposition figure Chamorro put under house arrest

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Police in Nicaragua have placed opposition presidential hopeful Cristiana Chamorro under house arrest.

Prosecutors have accused Ms Chamorro of money laundering, which she denies, and demand she be barred from running in November’s election.

Ms Chamorro is seen by many in the opposition as their best hope of defeating President Daniel Ortega, who is expected to run for a fifth term.

Her mother defeated Mr Ortega in the 1990 presidential poll.

The arrest is the latest in a series of measures which the opposition says are aimed at crushing its chances of defeating the government in the upcoming election.

Who is Cristiana Chamorro?

The 67-year-old journalist comes from one of Nicaragua’s most influential families.

Her father, Pedro Joaquín Chamorro, was the editor of newspaper La Prensa, which opposed the autocratic Somoza family that ruled Nicaragua for decades. He was assassinated in 1978.

Violeta Chamorro, her mother, won the 1990 election to become the first female president in Latin America, putting an end to Daniel Ortega’s first 11 years as president.

Cristiana Chamorro had until recently been leading the Violeta Barrios de Chamorro Foundation, which is focused on press freedom. But she stepped down from the post earlier this year.

On Tuesday, she announced she would seek to become the presidential candidate for the opposition Citizen’s Alliance. The Alliance wants to field one single name in the hope of defeating Mr Ortega.

The president, who has been in power since January 2007, is widely expected to run again, though an official announcement is yet to be made.

How did things get here?

Shortly after Ms Chamorro’s announcement, prosecutors accused her of “abusive management [and] ideological falsehood” during her time at the helm of the foundation.

She has also been charged with “the laundering of money, property and assets, to the detriment of the Nicaraguan State and society”.

The investigation against her was opened in May at the request of the Ortega government. Ms Chamorro says they are trumped up charges to prevent her from challenging the president.

On Wednesday, shortly before Ms Chamorro was due to give a news conference, police raided her home in the capital, Managua, and placed her under house arrest.

What’s the reaction been?

In a statement issued before Ms Chamorro’s arrest, the regional body Organization of American States (OAS), of which Nicaragua is a member, said the country was “heading for the worst possible elections”.

“The use of the prosecutor’s office, injunctions and precautionary measures, the politicised handling of justice and the de facto banning of candidates are in violation of the Inter-American Democratic Charter, the OAS Charter, the instruments on human rights and of international pacts to which Nicaragua is party,” the statement read.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken also condemned the move, saying on Twitter: “Arbitrarily banning opposition leader [Ms Chamorro] reflects Ortega’s fear of free and fair elections. Nicaraguans deserve real democracy.”

Opposition parties in Nicaragua accused the government of “unleashing a witch hunt”, alleging Mr Ortega feared “going to a free, transparent and observed” election.

Meanwhile government-friendly newspapers printed the arrest warrant issued for Ms Chamorro.

What’s the background?

Last December, the legislative, which is dominated by parties allied with the government, passed a law giving the government the power to ban candidates from running for office if they are deemed to be “traitors” to Nicaragua.

The government says the law aims to protect “the independence, the sovereignty and self-determination” of Nicaragua. It claims the country is under threat from imperialist powers in the US and “coup-mongers” within Nicaragua who are determined to overthrow the government.

The opposition alleges that repression has grown since 2018, when anti-government protests swept through the country and were met with a violent police response.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-57341542

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Latin America

Three abducted Catholic clergy released in Haiti

Published

on

Three members of the Catholic clergy kidnapped in Haiti earlier month this have been released, officials say.

But seven other people – including a French nun and a French priest – abducted in the town of Croix-des-Bouquets remain in captivity.

The kidnappers had demanded $1m (£722,000) as a ransom payment after they seized the group on 11 April.

Haiti’s President Jovenel Moïse has vowed to “do everything the law allows” to secure their release.

“Three of the seven clergy kidnapped on April 11 were released,” Father Loudger Mazile, spokesman for the Bishop’s Conference of the island nation, told the AFP on Thursday.

“The French were not released. There were no lay people among those released,” he said.

It is not known whether any ransom has been paid.

The attack happened when the Catholic clergy were on their way to the installation of a new parish priest.

A police source told AFP that a gang calling itself 400 Mazowo was most probably behind the abduction.

Kidnappings have surged in Haiti, with the Catholic Church describing the situation as “a descent into hell”.

While at first well-off business people were the main targets, victims have come from all walks of life. Religious groups have not been spared.

On 1 April, armed men burst into a service at an evangelical church on the outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and abducted the pastor and three other people. The service was being live-streamed on social media at the time.

The four were released three days later after an undisclosed sum was paid in ransom but the brazenness of kidnapping a pastor in the middle of a service shocked many Haitians.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-56854273

Continue Reading

Latin America

Coronavirus: What’s behind Latin America’s oxygen shortages?

Published

on

Before the clinic ran out of oxygen, Maria Auxiliadora da Cruz had been showing encouraging signs of progress against Covid-19. On 14 January, her oxygen levels had been above the normal level of 95% but, within hours of being deprived of that vital resource, her stats plummeted to 35%.

At this point, patients would normally be given intubation and oxygen by machine. Instead, the 67-year-old retired nurse died. “It was horrible,” her grieving daughter-in-law Thalita Rocha told the BBC. “It was a catastrophe. Many elderly patients began to deteriorate and turn blue.”

In an emotional video that went viral on social media, she described what was happening at Policlínica Redenção in the northern Brazilian city of Manaus. “We’re in a desperate situation. An entire emergency unit has simply run out of oxygen… A lot of people are dying.”

Brazil has the world’s second-highest Covid death toll with more than 221,000 fatalities. In Manaus, the health system has collapsed twice during the pandemic and deaths doubled between December and January.

Now there are fears the lack of oxygen supplies seen there could unfold elsewhere in Brazil and even in other parts of Latin America, where a second wave of Covid-19, in many countries, is proving to be worse than the first one.

In Peru, some hospitals have been unable to meet the demand brought by a steep rise in cases in recent weeks. As a result, patients’ relatives have had to hunt for oxygen in the black market. In some cases, they come back with nothing.

A black market is also thriving in Mexico, where more than 155,000 have died in the pandemic. To make things worse, there have been reports of thieves taking oxygen cylinders from hospitals and clinics.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) one in five Covid-19 patients will require oxygen. In severe cases, this rises to three in five. The organisation says some hospitals have seen demand for oxygen increase between five and seven times above normal levels because of the influx of patients with severe and critical disease.

The most dramatic situation in the world is in Brazil, where nearly 340,000 oxygen cylinders are needed every day, according to the Covid-19 Oxygen Needs tracker. The online tool helps estimate the scale of the challenge for policymakers and was developed by the Covid-19 Respiratory Care Response Coordination partnership which includes Path and Every Breath Counts.

Also according to the tracker, Mexico and Colombia each need more than 100,000 cylinders daily.

So how does a hospital run out of oxygen?

Oxygen has been considered an essential medicine by the WHO since 2017, but Lisa Smith, from Path’s market dynamics program, says ensuring adequate supply depends on many “components” falling into place.

This includes not only sources of production, but also training to enable medical staff to monitor and manage oxygen levels.1px transparent line

Medical oxygen is produced in large quantities at plants and delivered to hospitals in two ways: either in bulk in liquid tanks or as pressurised gas in cylinders containing smaller volumes.

Liquid oxygen is the cheapest and best technology available but it requires hospitals to have the right infrastructure to pipe oxygen to the patient’s bedside. This is common in developed countries such as the US and those in Europe.

Cylinders do not require pipes and can be delivered to clinics without a sophisticated infrastructure. However, their distribution on a smaller scale means they are less cost-effective, in addition to being cumbersome to transport and handle, which also carries an increased risk of cross-contamination.

Another source of production is on-site oxygen plants, which produce oxygen to be piped or compressed into cylinders. The WHO says it is currently trying to map how many such plants exist in the countries.

After Manaus reached crisis point, oxygen donations were sent from the federal government and other states – as the local providers said they were unable to increase production – and across the border from Venezuela. But even transporting them became a problem.

Jesem Orellana, an epidemiologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, said the risk of shortage continued and was exacerbated by global demand.

According to Path, medical oxygen accounts for just 5-10% of the world’s oxygen production. The rest is used in various industries, such as mining, chemical and pharmaceutical.

“We need to think about oxygen as much as we think about electricity, water or other essential utilities,” says Ms Smith. “This can’t be something that we’re only concerned about when it’s bad, because when it’s bad, people will die.”

In the meantime, there are concerns that the strain of Covid-19 on oxygen supplies could have a knock-on effect for the treatment of other diseases.

“Covid has shown us just how essential it is in countries where there is no vaccine against Covid, no medicines,” says Leith Greenslade, who leads the Every Breath Counts Coalition. “Often, it’s down to whether you get oxygen or not, whether you live or die.”

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-55829424

Continue Reading

Trending

Latin America

SALES LEADS LATAM: Mastercard, Beiersdorf, Nissan Brazil…

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clien..

Published

on

A summary for Corporate Marketers, Media Sales Executives and Advertising Agencies to see what clients are moving into the market and/or targeting Latin American consumers right now.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada's new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at [email protected]

For prior Sales Leads LatAm editions, click here.

  • Mastercard

Mastercard announced the launch of its Start Something Priceless campaign in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). For the first time in history, a brand brings together two football superstars of Latin America, Lionel Messi and Neymar da Silva Santos Jr. (Messi and Neymar Jr.), in an integrated marketing and communications platform to score against childhood hunger and malnutrition in LAC.The social movement, #JuntosSomos10 (TogetherWeAre10), will ignite the evolution of Mastercards iconic Priceless advertising campaign, transforming it from StoryTelling to StoryInspiring, appealing to todays socially engaged consumers.As part of their two-year partnership with Mastercard, Messi and Neymar Jr. will seek to inspire fans to join them in fighting childhood hunger and malnutrition through a series of cause-related marketing efforts supporting the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and other partners which will be incorporated into the movement over time.The campaign kicks-off on April 10th with the activation of the #TogetherWeAre10 social movement, encouraging consumers to join Mastercard in doing their part to make a difference in the world.Along the 2-year campaign, Mastercard aspires to have made a positive impact in the lives of children in the region by providing more than 10 million meals and supporting the fight against malnutrition across LAC. "Human connections are the foundation of the Latin culture,” says Ana Ferrell, Senior Vice President, Marketing and Communications, Mastercard LAC and Portada Council of the Americas member.

  • Beiersdorf

Dentsu Aegis Network Argentina has been awarded beauty and skin care brand Beiersdorf account. The agency will handle strategy development, planning and online and offline media buying for all of its brands, including Nivea, Eucerin and Curitas.

2018 NETWORKING SOLUTIONS. To find out about Portada's new networking solutions targeting the decision makers of the below campaigns, please contact Sales Manager Isabel Ojeda at [email protected]

  • Nissan Brazil

Nissan Industrial Complex in Resende, Brazil, has achieved the milestone of 30,000 cars made for overseas markets. The timing coincides with the second anniversary of the plants export program, which is exponentially growing due to an increased demand in Latin America.This is in part due to the success of Nissan Kicks as the ultimate addition to the brands export portfolio. Since December, the Argentinian market started to sell the crossover produced at the Resende Industrial Complex. Argentina had already been receiving the March hatchback and the Versa sedan from Brazils plant. Both models made in Brazil are also sold in Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay.

W.L. Gore & Associates has consolidated its global media business for its fabric division with Dentsu Aegis Network following a review, Adweek has reported.Dentsus Gravity, Carat and Amnet agencies will work with Gore-Tex—used in brand products from Adidas, Oakley, Patagonia, Converse and The North Face—across the Americas, Europe and Asia-Pacific.W.L. Gore & Associates Gore-Tex spent US$1.5 million on marketing efforts in the U.S. last year, according to Kantar Media.

NEW FEATURES TO PORTADA'S INTERACTIVE DATABASES
We have incorporated new features to the interactive database of corporate marketers and agency executives targeting LatAm consumers:
New Leads: Weekly more than 20 new leads uploaded to the Database by the Portada team as well as the contacts related to the above weekly Sales Leads column written by our editorial team.
Download the Database: Download the full Database in Excel Format.
Search Database: You can search through a user-friendly interactive Interface: Search Fields include: Name, Company/Agency, Job – Title, Address, Zip, E-mail, Accounts (Agency), Phone, Related News.

Celeste Martorana @celesmartorana

Celeste joined Portadas team in 2014. Since then, she has been working as an editor for Portadas English-language website and compiling information for Portadas Databases.

Original Article

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latin America

Nicaragua opposition figure Chamorro put under house arrest

Published

on

Police in Nicaragua have placed opposition presidential hopeful Cristiana Chamorro under house arrest.

Prosecutors have accused Ms Chamorro of money laundering, which she denies, and demand she be barred from running in November’s election.

Ms Chamorro is seen by many in the opposition as their best hope of defeating President Daniel Ortega, who is expected to run for a fifth term.

Her mother defeated Mr Ortega in the 1990 presidential poll.

The arrest is the latest in a series of measures which the opposition says are aimed at crushing its chances of defeating the government in the upcoming election.

Who is Cristiana Chamorro?

The 67-year-old journalist comes from one of Nicaragua’s most influential families.

Her father, Pedro Joaquín Chamorro, was the editor of newspaper La Prensa, which opposed the autocratic Somoza family that ruled Nicaragua for decades. He was assassinated in 1978.

Violeta Chamorro, her mother, won the 1990 election to become the first female president in Latin America, putting an end to Daniel Ortega’s first 11 years as president.

Cristiana Chamorro had until recently been leading the Violeta Barrios de Chamorro Foundation, which is focused on press freedom. But she stepped down from the post earlier this year.

On Tuesday, she announced she would seek to become the presidential candidate for the opposition Citizen’s Alliance. The Alliance wants to field one single name in the hope of defeating Mr Ortega.

The president, who has been in power since January 2007, is widely expected to run again, though an official announcement is yet to be made.

How did things get here?

Shortly after Ms Chamorro’s announcement, prosecutors accused her of “abusive management [and] ideological falsehood” during her time at the helm of the foundation.

She has also been charged with “the laundering of money, property and assets, to the detriment of the Nicaraguan State and society”.

The investigation against her was opened in May at the request of the Ortega government. Ms Chamorro says they are trumped up charges to prevent her from challenging the president.

On Wednesday, shortly before Ms Chamorro was due to give a news conference, police raided her home in the capital, Managua, and placed her under house arrest.

What’s the reaction been?

In a statement issued before Ms Chamorro’s arrest, the regional body Organization of American States (OAS), of which Nicaragua is a member, said the country was “heading for the worst possible elections”.

“The use of the prosecutor’s office, injunctions and precautionary measures, the politicised handling of justice and the de facto banning of candidates are in violation of the Inter-American Democratic Charter, the OAS Charter, the instruments on human rights and of international pacts to which Nicaragua is party,” the statement read.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken also condemned the move, saying on Twitter: “Arbitrarily banning opposition leader [Ms Chamorro] reflects Ortega’s fear of free and fair elections. Nicaraguans deserve real democracy.”

Opposition parties in Nicaragua accused the government of “unleashing a witch hunt”, alleging Mr Ortega feared “going to a free, transparent and observed” election.

Meanwhile government-friendly newspapers printed the arrest warrant issued for Ms Chamorro.

What’s the background?

Last December, the legislative, which is dominated by parties allied with the government, passed a law giving the government the power to ban candidates from running for office if they are deemed to be “traitors” to Nicaragua.

The government says the law aims to protect “the independence, the sovereignty and self-determination” of Nicaragua. It claims the country is under threat from imperialist powers in the US and “coup-mongers” within Nicaragua who are determined to overthrow the government.

The opposition alleges that repression has grown since 2018, when anti-government protests swept through the country and were met with a violent police response.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-57341542

Continue Reading

Latin America

Three abducted Catholic clergy released in Haiti

Published

on

Three members of the Catholic clergy kidnapped in Haiti earlier month this have been released, officials say.

But seven other people – including a French nun and a French priest – abducted in the town of Croix-des-Bouquets remain in captivity.

The kidnappers had demanded $1m (£722,000) as a ransom payment after they seized the group on 11 April.

Haiti’s President Jovenel Moïse has vowed to “do everything the law allows” to secure their release.

“Three of the seven clergy kidnapped on April 11 were released,” Father Loudger Mazile, spokesman for the Bishop’s Conference of the island nation, told the AFP on Thursday.

“The French were not released. There were no lay people among those released,” he said.

It is not known whether any ransom has been paid.

The attack happened when the Catholic clergy were on their way to the installation of a new parish priest.

A police source told AFP that a gang calling itself 400 Mazowo was most probably behind the abduction.

Kidnappings have surged in Haiti, with the Catholic Church describing the situation as “a descent into hell”.

While at first well-off business people were the main targets, victims have come from all walks of life. Religious groups have not been spared.

On 1 April, armed men burst into a service at an evangelical church on the outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and abducted the pastor and three other people. The service was being live-streamed on social media at the time.

The four were released three days later after an undisclosed sum was paid in ransom but the brazenness of kidnapping a pastor in the middle of a service shocked many Haitians.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-56854273

Continue Reading

Latin America

Coronavirus: What’s behind Latin America’s oxygen shortages?

Published

on

Before the clinic ran out of oxygen, Maria Auxiliadora da Cruz had been showing encouraging signs of progress against Covid-19. On 14 January, her oxygen levels had been above the normal level of 95% but, within hours of being deprived of that vital resource, her stats plummeted to 35%.

At this point, patients would normally be given intubation and oxygen by machine. Instead, the 67-year-old retired nurse died. “It was horrible,” her grieving daughter-in-law Thalita Rocha told the BBC. “It was a catastrophe. Many elderly patients began to deteriorate and turn blue.”

In an emotional video that went viral on social media, she described what was happening at Policlínica Redenção in the northern Brazilian city of Manaus. “We’re in a desperate situation. An entire emergency unit has simply run out of oxygen… A lot of people are dying.”

Brazil has the world’s second-highest Covid death toll with more than 221,000 fatalities. In Manaus, the health system has collapsed twice during the pandemic and deaths doubled between December and January.

Now there are fears the lack of oxygen supplies seen there could unfold elsewhere in Brazil and even in other parts of Latin America, where a second wave of Covid-19, in many countries, is proving to be worse than the first one.

In Peru, some hospitals have been unable to meet the demand brought by a steep rise in cases in recent weeks. As a result, patients’ relatives have had to hunt for oxygen in the black market. In some cases, they come back with nothing.

A black market is also thriving in Mexico, where more than 155,000 have died in the pandemic. To make things worse, there have been reports of thieves taking oxygen cylinders from hospitals and clinics.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) one in five Covid-19 patients will require oxygen. In severe cases, this rises to three in five. The organisation says some hospitals have seen demand for oxygen increase between five and seven times above normal levels because of the influx of patients with severe and critical disease.

The most dramatic situation in the world is in Brazil, where nearly 340,000 oxygen cylinders are needed every day, according to the Covid-19 Oxygen Needs tracker. The online tool helps estimate the scale of the challenge for policymakers and was developed by the Covid-19 Respiratory Care Response Coordination partnership which includes Path and Every Breath Counts.

Also according to the tracker, Mexico and Colombia each need more than 100,000 cylinders daily.

So how does a hospital run out of oxygen?

Oxygen has been considered an essential medicine by the WHO since 2017, but Lisa Smith, from Path’s market dynamics program, says ensuring adequate supply depends on many “components” falling into place.

This includes not only sources of production, but also training to enable medical staff to monitor and manage oxygen levels.1px transparent line

Medical oxygen is produced in large quantities at plants and delivered to hospitals in two ways: either in bulk in liquid tanks or as pressurised gas in cylinders containing smaller volumes.

Liquid oxygen is the cheapest and best technology available but it requires hospitals to have the right infrastructure to pipe oxygen to the patient’s bedside. This is common in developed countries such as the US and those in Europe.

Cylinders do not require pipes and can be delivered to clinics without a sophisticated infrastructure. However, their distribution on a smaller scale means they are less cost-effective, in addition to being cumbersome to transport and handle, which also carries an increased risk of cross-contamination.

Another source of production is on-site oxygen plants, which produce oxygen to be piped or compressed into cylinders. The WHO says it is currently trying to map how many such plants exist in the countries.

After Manaus reached crisis point, oxygen donations were sent from the federal government and other states – as the local providers said they were unable to increase production – and across the border from Venezuela. But even transporting them became a problem.

Jesem Orellana, an epidemiologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, said the risk of shortage continued and was exacerbated by global demand.

According to Path, medical oxygen accounts for just 5-10% of the world’s oxygen production. The rest is used in various industries, such as mining, chemical and pharmaceutical.

“We need to think about oxygen as much as we think about electricity, water or other essential utilities,” says Ms Smith. “This can’t be something that we’re only concerned about when it’s bad, because when it’s bad, people will die.”

In the meantime, there are concerns that the strain of Covid-19 on oxygen supplies could have a knock-on effect for the treatment of other diseases.

“Covid has shown us just how essential it is in countries where there is no vaccine against Covid, no medicines,” says Leith Greenslade, who leads the Every Breath Counts Coalition. “Often, it’s down to whether you get oxygen or not, whether you live or die.”

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-55829424

Continue Reading

Trending

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