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Forgot your Opal card? Tap on and off with credit and debit cards

RAIL Action Bathurst chairman John Hollis has mixed feelings about the NSW Governments decision to allow commuters to use credit and debit cards to tap on and off at train stations. The NSW Government has made it easier for commuters to pay through their contactless credit and debit cards for the same cost as their Opal card fare. “Mobile wallets on smartphones, tablets and wearable devices linked to an American Express, Mastercard and Visa card can also be used to tap on at train station Opal readers,” the NSW Government said. “Using contactless payment, you will be entitled to daily, weekly and Sunday travel caps, but the weekly travel discount, concessions and the transfer discount will only be available through Opal.” This is applicable across the Sydney Trains network and on any NSW Train Link Opal service, including the Bathurst Bullet train that travels from Bathurst to Sydney every morning and returns in the evening. More than 1500 passengers board the Bathurst Bullet every month, according to Transport for NSW. Read also: Bathurst school closed for a day after hoax threats sent to student Mr Hollis said the move gives commuters flexibility, but he was not sure how the NSW Government will deal with problems that come with using credit and debit cards at stations. “I have no idea how they will manage and control it,” he said. Mr Hollis said there could be security problems such as a thief using a stolen credit card to travel on trains. “There will be more problems than solutions,” he said. Mr Hollis raised concerns about checking train fares and tickets on trains when credit and debit cards were used. Read also: Thief with a taste for sausage rolls caught red-handed then punched store worker According to a recent survey, about 92.5 per cent of commuters comply with fares on NSW TrainLink – Intercity. The NSW Government lost $4.3 million in revenue for six months to June 2018 because of non-compliant customers, including those not carrying an Opal card, not tapping on, and those travelling on discounted Opal products without valid entitlements. Orange Rail Action Group spokesman Phil Stevenson said it is a good move if it helps people in the country. “We dont have Opal cards, so it will be nice,” Mr Stevenson said. Orange residents travel to Bathurst to catch the Bullet train to Sydney. They have been demanding a direct train service from Orange to Sydney. Read also: Paying too much for electricity? Heres your chance to avoid the shocks Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, Andrew Constance, said the contactless transport payment trial will continue to run through 2018 and an expansion to the bus network is expected in mid-2019. “EFTPOS is also being considered for inclusion in the trial,” Mr Constance said. “Opal is not going anywhere and is still the most affordable way to pay for your fares. This is the NSW Government providing greater flexibility and convenience.”

RAIL Action Bathurst chairman John Hollis has mixed feelings about the NSW Governments decision to allow commuters to use credit and debit cards to tap on and off at train stations.

The NSW Government has made it easier for commuters to pay through their contactless credit and debit cards for the same cost as their Opal card fare.

“Mobile wallets on smartphones, tablets and wearable devices linked to an American Express, Mastercard and Visa card can also be used to tap on at train station Opal readers,” the NSW Government said.

“Using contactless payment, you will be entitled to daily, weekly and Sunday travel caps, but the weekly travel discount, concessions and the transfer discount will only be available through Opal.”

This is applicable across the Sydney Trains network and on any NSW Train Link Opal service, including the Bathurst Bullet train that travels from Bathurst to Sydney every morning and returns in the evening.

Read also:

Mr Hollis said the move gives commuters flexibility, but he was not sure how the NSW Government will deal with problems that come with using credit and debit cards at stations.

“I have no idea how they will manage and control it,” he said.

Mr Hollis said there could be security problems such as a thief using a stolen credit card to travel on trains.

“There will be more problems than solutions,” he said.

Mr Hollis raised concerns about checking train fares and tickets on trains when credit and debit cards were used.

Read also:

According to a recent survey, about 92.5 per cent of commuters comply with fares on NSW TrainLink – Intercity.

The NSW Government lost $4.3 million in revenue for six months to June 2018 because of non-compliant customers, including those not carrying an Opal card, not tapping on, and those travelling on discounted Opal products without valid entitlements.

Orange Rail Action Group spokesman Phil Stevenson said it is a good move if it helps people in the country.

“We dont have Opal cards, so it will be nice,” Mr Stevenson said.

Orange residents travel to Bathurst to catch the Bullet train to Sydney.

They have been demanding a direct train service from Orange to Sydney.

Read also:

Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, Andrew Constance, said the contactless transport payment trial will continue to run through 2018 and an expansion to the bus network is expected in mid-2019.

“EFTPOS is also being considered for inclusion in the trial,” Mr Constance said.

“Opal is not going anywhere and is still the most affordable way to pay for your fares. This is the NSW Government providing greater flexibility and convenience.”

This story Forgot your Opal card? Tap on and off with credit and debit cards first appeared on Western Advocate.

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