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World News and International Headlines NPR world news, international art and culture, world business and financial markets, world economy, and global trends in health, science and technology. Subscribe to the World Story of the Day podcast and RSS feed.


Four Days In August

August 19, 1953: Massive protests broke out across Iran, leaving almost 300 dead in firefights in the streets of Tehran. Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh was soon overthrown in a coup orchestrated by the CIA and British intelligence. The Shah was reinstalled as Iran's leader.

AFP/Getty Images

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AFP/Getty Images

Four Days In August


Ex-State Department Worker Gets 40 Months In Prison For Secret Dealings With China

The State Department in Washington, D.C., in 2014. A former ­office manager there was sentenced to 40 months in prison for concealing her exchanges with Chinese intelligence agents.

Luis M. Alvarez/AP

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Luis M. Alvarez/AP


Once A Symbol Of Freedom, Sudan's Pop Radio Station Has Fallen Almost Silent

"I'm trying to keep hope, because everyone is leaving, bro," says Ahmad Hikmat, Content Director of Capital FM in Khartoum. "I am losing my team one by one."

Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

Once A Symbol Of Freedom, Sudan's Pop Radio Station Has Fallen Almost Silent


President Trump Warns Of New Sanctions On Iran After Breaches Of Nuclear Deal

U.S. Ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency Jackie Wolcott at a board of governors meeting in Vienna, Austria on Wednesday.

Alex Halada/AFP/Getty Images

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Alex Halada/AFP/Getty Images


View From London: Did U.K. Ambassador's Pro-Europe Stance Make Him A Target?

The British Embassy in Washington, D.C. Kim Darroch resigned as U.K. ambassador to the U.S. on Wednesday, after cables in which he criticized the Trump administration were leaked. Boris Johnson, expected to become the new prime minister, said nothing in Darroch's support.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP


The Famous Big 5 Personality Test Might Not Reveal The True You

Malaka Gharib


Worldwide Smuggling Crackdown Rescues Endangered Wildlife

Road inspections in Mexico intercept this white tiger cub concealed in a van.

Interpol

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Interpol


White House Adviser: On Mideast Peace Plan, 'We Are Aiming For The Home Run'

Jason Greenblatt (left) and Jared Kushner attended a Middle East peace meeting in February in Warsaw, Poland.

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

White House Adviser: On Mideast Peace Plan, 'We Are Aiming For The Home Run'


Brazil Judge Orders Mining Company To Pay For Damage From Dam Disaster

Residents and relatives of victims place messages on the bridge over the Paraopeba River, during a tribute to those who died after a tailings dam collapsed in the town of Brumadinho, Brazil.

Douglas Magno /AFP/Getty Images

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Douglas Magno /AFP/Getty Images


Girls Captured By Boko Haram Brought Into Focus In 'Beneath The Tamarind Tree'

People attend a demonstration calling on the government to rescue the kidnapped girls of the government secondary school in Chibok, in Abuja, Nigeria on Oct. 14, 2014.

Olamikan Gbemiga/AP

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Olamikan Gbemiga/AP


U.K. Ambassador To U.S. Resigns After Trump Vowed He Won't 'Deal With Him'

British Ambassador to Washington Kim Darroch, seen here in 2017, submitted his resignation Wednesday following the publication of embarrassing internal memos bashing the Trump administration.

Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP

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Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP


In Juárez, 'Remain In Mexico' Policy Casts Asylum-Seekers Back Into Uncertainty

Julio, 12, with his mother Grisélida, 44, crossed into the U.S. seeking asylum, but they were returned to Mexico. The shelter they tried to go to was full, so they are staying in a hotel basement. They fled their home in Honduras when a gang began recruiting Julio.

Claire Harbage/NPR

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Juárez, 'Remain In Mexico' Policy Casts Asylum-Seekers Back Into Uncertainty


How Oman Has Become A Key Diplomatic Player In The Middle East

The Sultan Qaboos Mosque in Salalah, Oman. The country has emerged as a quiet facilitator of dialogue, including between Iran and the U.S.

Sam McNeil/AP

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Sam McNeil/AP

How Oman Has Become A Key Diplomatic Player In The Middle East


France Plans To Put An 'Ecotax' On Nearly All Air Travel

French Transport Minister Elisabeth Borne says a new tax on airfares "is a response to the ecological urgency and sense of injustice expressed by the French." She's seen here with Minister for the Ecological and Inclusive Transition Francois de Rugy.

Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters

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Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters


Nicki Minaj Cancels Saudi Arabia Performance, Citing Human Rights Concerns

Nicki Minaj has cancelled her performance in Saudi Arabia due to pressure from human rights activists.

Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

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Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

Nicki Minaj Cancels Saudi Arabia Performance, Citing Human Rights Concerns


The Last VW Beetle Rolls Off The Assembly Line In Mexico This Week

A 2019 Volkswagen Beetle convertible on display at the Pittsburgh International Auto Show in February.

Gene J. Puskar/AP

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

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Senate impeachment trial arguments to start February 9

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The second Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is scheduled to begin on February 9 after Senate leaders reached a deal to push it back, giving Trump’s legal team more time to prepare and Senate Democrats a chance to consider Covid-19 legislation and to confirm President Joe Biden’s Cabinet.

House Democrats will formally walk over the single article of impeachment against Trump to the Senate on Monday evening, but the agreement between Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will push back the substance of the trial until February. Without an agreement, the trial would have started the afternoon after the article was transmitted to the Senate.
“We have made good progress in our efforts to determine the timing and structure of the impeachment trial of Donald J Trump,” Schumer said Friday evening announcing the trial schedule, saying it would begin the week of February 8.
Under the agreement, the ceremonial functions of the trial will occur next week, with the articles being presented on Monday and senators being sworn in as jurors on Tuesday. Then the trial will pause, while the House impeachment managers and Trump’s legal team exchange pre-trial briefs for two weeks. The final briefs would be due on February 9, allowing the trial itself to begin.
A delay to the impeachment trial also makes sense for Democrats because the trial had threatened to stall the confirmation of Biden’s Cabinet, as well as put a stop to any consideration of another Covid stimulus package, as Senate Republicans said Friday they would not allow the Senate to confirm nominees at the same time the trial is going on. The trial’s timing had been one of several logistical hurdles the Senate is tackling amid broader negotiations between Schumer and McConnell over how the 50-50 Senate will be governed.
McConnell had proposed delaying the trial until early February, arguing that Trump’s legal team should be given ample time to prepare after the House’s swift impeachment of Trump for “incitement of insurrection” earlier this month. The timeline Schumer announced Friday evening is one week earlier that what McConnell had proposed, but the Kentucky Republican’s team praised the agreement Friday.” This is a win for due process and fairness,” said McConnell spokesman
The length of the trial is still an open question and will depend both on whether the House impeachment managers seek to call witnesses and the length of senators’ questions for the legal teams. But sources say most believe the trial will be shorter than the three-week 2020 impeachment trial for Trump.
The timing for the trial had remained unsettled on Friday morning as the negotiations continued between Senate leaders. On Friday morning, Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the House would transmit the impeachment article to the Senate on Monday, in effect setting a deadline for the Senate to cut a deal on the trial timing.
“We are respectful of the Senate’s constitutional power over the trial and always attentive to the fairness of the process, noting that the former president will have had the same amount of time to prepare for trial as our Managers,” Pelosi said Friday. “Our Managers are ready to begin to make their case to 100 Senate jurors through the trial process.”
Republicans made clear Friday that Biden’s agenda would have been frozen until the Senate finished the trial, had it taken place next week.
“We won’t be doing any confirmations, we won’t be doing any Covid-19 relief, we won’t be doing anything else other than impeaching a person who’s not even president,” said Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, a member of Senate GOP leadership.
Cornyn said Republicans haven’t given consent to bifurcate the trial days to take up nominations during the trial. “No, it’s not gonna happen,” he said.
In order to convict Trump, Democrats need a two-thirds majority, meaning at least 17 Republicans would have to vote to convict Trump, assuming that all 50 Democrats do. Ten House Republicans joined with Democrats to impeach.
Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski, considered a swing GOP vote, said Friday that the process “has to be fair.”
“My thought process is to see what happens as this unfolds,” she said. “You know, we learned this morning that Speaker Pelosi is going to transmit the article on Monday. As I understand, right now, there hasn’t been an agreed-to schedule on the pre-trial. I think what McConnell laid down was eminently reasonable, in terms of making sure that we got process. Got to have process and the process has to be fair. So yeah, so we’ve got to get started, I guess.”
The Biden administration has publicly taken a hands-off approach to the impeachment process has publicly taken a hands-off approach to the impeachment process. Biden has never had a strong appetite for impeaching Trump, advisers say, but he also has little desire for allowing the Senate trial to drag out any longer than necessary.
“We need to move past this,” a Biden official told CNN. “The only way for that to happen is for the trial to begin.”
But Biden said at a White House announcement Friday that he saw the upside to waiting on the trial. “The more time we have to get up and running and meet these crises, the better,” he said.

‘It will be a full trial’

A faction of Senate Republicans has argued that the impeachment trial would be unconstitutional because Trump has already left office. It’s an argument that Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, has suggested Trump’s legal team should adopt.
“I think it’s obvious that the post-presidential impeachment has never occurred in the history of the country for a reason, that it’s unconstitutional, that it sets a bad precedent for the presidency and it continues to divide the nation,” Graham said Friday.
But Schumer pushed back on that argument, noting that both liberal and conservative legal scholars have said there is precedent for an impeachment trial of a former official.
“The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Schumer said. “It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial. But make no mistake, there will be a trial, and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald John Trump incited the insurrection against the United States.”
McConnell said Friday that the Senate should give Trump a “full and fair process” to mount his impeachment defense.
“This impeachment began with an unprecedentedly fast and minimal process over in the House. The sequel cannot be an insufficient Senate process that denies former President Trump his due process or damages the Senate or the presidency itself,” McConnell said. “Senate Republicans strongly believe we need a full and fair process where the former president can mount a defense and the Senate can properly consider the factual, legal, and constitutional questions at stake.”

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‘QAnon Shaman’ Jake Angeli charged over pro-Trump riots

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A prominent follower of the baseless conspiracy theory QAnon has been charged over the US Capitol riots.

Jacob Anthony Chansley, known as Jake Angeli, is in custody on charges including violent entry and disorderly conduct.

Mr Chansley, who calls himself the QAnon Shaman, is allegedly the man pictured with a painted face, fur hat and horns inside Congress on Wednesday.

Donald Trump faces another impeachment charge for his role in the unrest.

Democrats accuse the president of encouraging the riots, in which five people died.

The FBI has been appealing to the public to help bring the assailants to justice.

Mr Chansley has not commented publicly on the charges.

A statement from the federal attorney for Washington DC said: “It is alleged that Chansley was identified as the man seen in media coverage who entered the Capitol building dressed in horns, a bearskin headdress, red, white and blue face paint, shirtless, and tan pants.

“This individual carried a spear, approximately 6 feet in length, with an American flag tied just below the blade.”

The statement said police had also detained a man from Florida believed to have been photographed carrying House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s lectern from the House of Representatives chamber.

Adam Johnson, 36, is being held on charges including one count of theft of government property and one count of violent entry.

Also among those charged is West Virginia lawmaker, Derrick Evans. He is alleged to have posted a video of himself online, standing outside the building with Trump supporters, and then going inside.

He was arrested on Friday and is also accused of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol Grounds, the Department of Justice statement said.

More than a dozen people have now been charged in offences related to the assault on the Capitol building. They include an Alabama man allegedly found with 11 Molotov cocktails near the unrest.

Mr Trump is due to leave office in 11 days. Democrats in the House of Representatives plan to introduce an article of impeachment against him on Monday, for “incitement of insurrection”.

A White House spokesperson said impeaching the president at this late stage would only further divide the country.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-55606044

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US election: Trump tells Georgia election official to ‘find’ votes to overturn Biden win

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US President Donald Trump has been recorded telling Georgia’s top election official to “find” enough votes to overturn the election result.

“I just want to find 11,780 votes,” Mr Trump told Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in a recording released by the Washington Post.

Mr Raffensperger is heard replying that Georgia’s results were correct.

Mr Biden won Georgia alongside other swing states, winning 306 electoral college votes to his Mr Trump’s 232.

Since the 3 November vote, Mr Trump has been alleging widespread electoral fraud without providing any evidence.

He tweeted on Sunday that Mr Raffensperger had not given details of the fraud the president alleges. “He has no clue!” the president tweeted.

All 50 states have certified the election result, some after recounts and legal appeals. So far, US courts have rejected 60 challenges to Mr Biden’s win.

Congress is due to formally approve the election result on 6 January.

Mr Biden, a Democrat, is due to be inaugurated as president on 20 January.

Voters in Georgia are due to vote again on Tuesday to elect two senators for the state. The result could determine the balance of power in the Senate – if the two Democrat contenders win, then there will be equal numbers of Republican and Democratic senators and Democratic Vice-president-elect Kamala Harris will have the deciding vote.

Mr Biden’s Democrats already control the lower House of Representatives.

What happened during the call?

In the excerpts released by Washington Post, Mr Trump can be heard alternately cajoling and pressurising Georgia’s secretary of state.

He insisted that he had won the election in Georgia and told Mr Raffensperger that there was “nothing wrong with saying you have recalculated”.

Mr Raffensperger responded by saying: “The challenge you have Mr president is that the data you have is wrong.”

Later in the call Mr Trump said the rumour was that ballots had been shredded and voting machinery had been removed from Fulton County in the state – a charge Mr Raffensperger’s lawyer said it was not the case.

The president then threatened the official with possible legal consequences.

“You know what they did and you’re not reporting it. That’s a criminal offence. You can’t let that happen. That’s a big risk to you and to Ryan, your lawyer,” Mr Trump said.

He told Mr Raffensperger he should re-examine the result in the state.

“You can re-examine it, but re-examine it with people who want to find answers, not people who don’t want to find answers,” he said.

“Mr President, you have people who submit information and we have our people that submit information and then it comes before the court and the court has to make a determination,” Mr Raffensperger replied. “We have to stand by our numbers, we believe our numbers are right.”

 

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/election-us-2020-55524838

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