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Bolivian President Evo Morales announces resignation

Bolivian President Evo Morales said on Sunday he would resign after the military called on him to step down and allies deserted him following weeks of protests over a disputed election that has roiled the South American nation

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Morales, in power for nearly 14 years, said in televised comments that he would submit his resignation letter to help restore stability, though he aimed barbs at what he called a "civic coup."

"I am resigning, sending my letter of resignation to the Legislative Assembly," Morales said, adding that it was his "obligation as indigenous president and president of all Bolivians to seek peace."

Vice President Álvaro García Linera also resigned.

The resignation of Morales, a leftist icon and the last survivor of Latin America's leftist "pink tide" of two decades ago, is likely to send shockwaves across the region at a time when left-leaning leaders have returned to power in Mexico and Argentina.

Pressure had been ramping up on Morales since he was declared the winner of an October 20 vote. The head of Bolivia's armed forces earlier on Sunday said the military had asked him to step down to help restore stability after weeks of protests over the election.

"We suggest the President of the State renounce his presidential mandate, allowing peace to be restored and the stability maintained for the good of our Bolivia," General Williams Kaliman, the commander of Bolivia's armed forces, said shortly before Morales announced his resignation.

"Likewise, we ask the Bolivian people and mobilized sectors to shed attitudes of violence and disorder among brothers so as not to stain our families with blood, pain and mourning."

Earlier on Sunday, Morales had agreed to hold new elections after a report from the Organization of American States (OAS), which conducted an audit of the Oct. 20 vote, revealed serious irregularities in the election.

The OAS report said the October vote should be annulled after it had found "clear manipulations" of the voting system that called into question Morales' win, with a lead of just over 10 points over main rival Carlos Mesa.

'Today we won a battle'

The resignations of Morales and his vice president meant it was not initially clear who would take the helm of the country pending the results of new elections.

According to Bolivian law, in the absence of the president and vice president, the head of the Senate would take over provisionally.

Morales, speaking at an earlier news conference, had tried to placate critics saying he would replace the electoral tribunal for the new vote, though his opponents – already angry that he ran in defiance of term limits – were not assuaged.

The election standoff has dented the image of Morales – who has helmed Bolivia through a period of relative stability and economic growth – and hit the landlocked nation's economy.

His "legacy will be compromised and the region will suffer another impact with consequences well beyond Bolivia," said Juan Cruz Diaz, managing director of risk advisory Cefeidas Group, referring to Argentina, Chile, Peru, Paraguay and Brazil.

Luis Fernando Camacho, a civic leader from the eastern city of Santa Cruz who has become a symbol of the opposition, said the OAS report on Sunday clearly demonstrated election fraud. He had reiterated his call for Morales to resign.

"Today we won a battle," Camacho told a crowd of cheering supporters in the capital before Morales' resignation, though he added more time was needed to repair the constitutional order and democracy. "Only when we can be sure that democracy is solid, then will we go back home."

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had also welcomed the call for a new vote to "ensure free and fair elections."

Morales allies fall

As the fall-out from the audit report swept across BoliviRead More – Source

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