Connect with us

Tech

A decidedly non-Linux distro walkthrough: Haiku R1/beta2

Enlarge / Haiku's bright, colorful boot splash feels like something you'd see on Tom Nook&..

Published

on

Enlarge / Haiku's bright, colorful boot splash feels like something you'd see on Tom Nook's computer.Jim Salter

Earlier this month, the Haiku project released the second beta of its namesake operating system, Haiku.

Haiku is the reimagining of a particularly ambitious, forward-looking operating system from 1995—Be, Inc.'s BeOS. BeOS was developed to take advantage of Symmetrical Multi-Processing (SMP) hardware using techniques we take for granted today—kernel-scheduled pre-emptive multitasking, ubiquitous multithreading, and BFS—a 64-bit journaling filesystem of its very own.

BeOS—the Apple OS that never quite was

This prototype Bebox's two AT&T Hobbit processors lurk—uncooled!—beneath a Trident video card.
Enlarge / This prototype Bebox's two AT&T Hobbit processors lurk—uncooled!—beneath a Trident video card.Ludovic Hirlimann

Most of those who remember BeOS remember it for its failed bid to become Apple's premiere operating system. The platform was created by Jean Louis Gassée, a former Apple executive who wanted to continue work he had done on the discontinued Apple Jaguar project. In its early days, Be developed the machine for its own hardware, called the BeBox—a system with two AT&T Hobbit processors on which BeOS' unrivaled attention to SMP efficiency could shine.

Unfortunately for Be, AT&T discontinued the Hobbit in 1994—a move that perhaps should have been anticipated by Gassée, given that Apple itself had originally approached AT&T to develop the Hobbit, but then abandoned it due to it being "rife with bugs… and overpriced." In the scramble to find a new hardware platform, Be moved to PowerPC architecture. The company moved through eight hardware revisions in two years before giving up on designing its own hardware.

The next step for BeOS was Apple's own Common Hardware Reference Platform. Apple was in dire need of a refresh for the aging MacOS Classic, and briefly the tech industry was abuzz with the possibility that BeOS would be the next Apple operating system—but Gassée and Apple's then-CEO Gil Amelio couldn't agree on a price. Gassée demanded $300 million, but Amelio wouldn't go higher than $125 million. In the wake of the stalled negotiations, Apple's board decided to bring founder Steve Jobs back into the fold by purchasing his NeXT, instead.

This was the beginning of the end for BeOS, which went through another four years looking for a home—distributed first on Power Computing's Mac clones, then Intel x86 computers, and even a free, stripped down "Personal Edition" intended to drum up consumer interest, which could be run atop either Microsoft Windows or Linux. In 2001, the rights to BeOS were sold off to Palm, largely ending the original BeOS saga.

Although Be, Inc sold the rights to BeOS to Palm in 2001, its community had no intention of abandoning the project—it founded an OpenBeOS project the same year. In 2004, Palm sent a notification of trademark infringement regarding the name, and the project renamed itself Haiku.

Back to the present: Installing Haiku R1/Beta 2

  • You can run the Haiku installer directly, or you can run it from within the live desktop itself. Jim Salter
  • An enormous variety of partition types are available here. The choices here refer only to Type ID—not formatted filesystem. Jim Salter
  • When Haiku asks you to "initialize" a Be File System partition, what it really means is "format." Back to the partitioner! Jim Salter
  • Right-clicking the new partition, then selecting Format->Be File System is the step we missed before. Jim Salter
  • Success! We can now click "Begin"—from here, we're literally only a minute or so away from a fully installed Haiku system. Jim Salter

In June 2020—nineteen years after OpenBeOS was born, and sixteen after its rename to Haiku—the project released its second beta distribution. The project still adheres to backward application compatibility with 1990s BeOS—although only in its 32-bit version, which I did not test.

Haiku's installer is easy to use, if you know what you're doing—but that caveat is an important one. There's a live desktop option, but I dove straight into the full hardware install in a new Haiku VM, and it was a bit frustrating.

Disk partitioning is both necessary and entirely manual. The installer tells you it will need "at least one partition [initialized] with the Be File System" but otherwise leaves you alone. Inside the partition manager, there are no hints about "Intel Partition Map" vs "GUID Partition Map"—or whether a GUID Partition Map will also need a BIOS Boot Partition.

It's also not clear that creating a "Be File System" here really just means setting a Type ID on a raw partition and isn't sufficient to let the installation continue. After creating the partition, you must then select it and format it—the installer won't do it for you and won't warn you why the installation can't continue, either.

Once I'd figured that out, I went with a GUID partition scheme, created a 1000MiB BIOS Boot partition, allocated the rest of my 32GiB virtual drive to a BFS partition, and formatted it. The main installer stopped complaining that it couldn't find a valid installation target, and the rest of the installation was over with in a minute or less.

Listing image by Jim Salter

First impressions, and the WebPositive browser

  • The Quick Tour's index has 19 neatly laid-out sections… but the anchor links only work for the first nine. This should be considered foreshadowing. Jim Salter
  • The Quick Tour shortcut loaded in Haiku's default browser, WebPositive. WebPositive does not handle Ars very well—it failed to render several elements at all. Jim Salter
  • WebPositive really, really didn't like being asked to load up YouTube. Neither did Haiku itself; this appears to be Haiku's version of a bluescreen or kernel panic. Jim Salter
  • WebPositive threw an extremely verbose SSL error, apparently related to Amazon ads, when asked to display YouTube competitor Vimeo. Jim Salter
  • WebPositive manages to get through a Gmail login, but then crashes entirely while rendering the interface. sad trombone noise Jim Salter
  • The best thing about Haiku so far is how easy it is to generate fully detailed crash reports. Unfortunately, you'll get the chance to do that quite a lot. Jim Salter

There is a distinct, retrofuturistic air of the late 1990s about Haiku. If you gave an artist who had never seen a modern operating system four hours to spend with Windows NT 3.51, then asked them to imagine this operating system ten years in the future, you could end up with something that looks and feels very much like Haiku.

The desktop interface is primitive and funky, but—much like the OS' boot time—it's extremely snappy. This strengthened my feeling of deja vu—it reminded me strongly of removing Windows 98 from a friend's underpowered Packard Bell and installing Windows 3.11 for Workgroups in its place. Sure, it was uglier and less user-friendly afterwards—but the little Pentium 75 without enough RAM to comfortably run Windows 98 just flew on the much older 3.11.

Unfortunately, Haiku also feels very buggy and half-finished. Staring at the desktop on first boot, it's not immediately apparent what will function as a launcher. Double-clicking "Quick Tour" brings up twenty or so pages of Haiku's "features and peculiarities." But it loaded in what was clearly a Web browser—so I typed arstechnica.com into the address bar, and off I went.

[vimeo 210599507 w=980 h=550]
Once we clicked through the obnoxious SSL error, WebPositive played this extremely surreal Inori video well enough.

Trying to browse the Internet in WebPositive, the Haiku default browser, is a frustrating experience. It failed to render several elements on the Ars front page, and that was the best experience I had with it—when I tried to move on to YouTube, the entire display server crashed. A forced reboot later, I tried Vimeo instead—which mostly worked but threw an obnoxious, page-filling SSL error. Moving on to Gmail, WebPositive did manage to login—but crashed while trying to render the actual mailbox.

The best thing about this experience was the application crash dialog, which pops up whenever something grenades itself. One click saves a full crash log to the desktop, and it's quite detailed. Unfortunately, any attempt to browse the Web means you'll be seeing a lot of that dialog—very few browsers are available for Haiku, and none is entirely functional.

Installing software in Haiku

  • Haiku Depot looks and feels much like FreeBSD's GUI interface to pkg did back in the 1990s. It's packed with applications you've never heard of, and a few better-known exceptions. Jim Salter
  • If you tell Haiku Depot you want to install a package, it spawns a dependency list, then gives you a chance to Apply changes. Jim Salter
  • After installation, you're given the chance to launch the newly installed app directly from its Depot page, as well as from the unlabeled blue feather on the top right—which turns out to be the Applications launcher. Jim Salter

Haiku has its own graphical package manager, called Haiku Depot. It's extremely reminiscent of FreeBSD's graphical interface to its own pkg management tool—old-school gray dialogs, organized loosely into overall categories, packed chock-full of application names you've likely never heard of, with a few better-known exceptions popping up here and there.

I was very disappointed with WebPositive's failure to render nearly any site properly, so I selected Haiku's "Internet and Network" category. Inside, I found two additional browsers—NetSurf, and Otter Browser. A more careful look showed that this was a filtered view, showing featured packages only.

Selecting "all packages" instead didn't make much difference—this exposed an additional pair of terminal-based options similar to Lynx and one more graphical browser called "Dooble." Neither Firefox nor Chromium was available.

Web, web everywhere, and nary a browser that works

  • The Ars front page looks much better in Otter than it did in WebPositive—it still looks a bit odd, but at least all the major elements rendered. Jim Salter
  • Clicking through to an article and expanding the browser from Windowed to full-screen mode, things look pretty good. It's kind of nice seeing old-school metrics like load time element count on the bottom bar. Jim Salter
  • YouTube doesn't like Otter any more than it liked WebPositive—but at least neither the app nor the OS itself crashed this time. Jim Salter
  • Vimeo mostly worked in WebPositive. It doesn't work at all in Otter.
  • This is the Ars front page, as rendered in NetSurf. We do not recommend NetSurf. Jim Salter
  • We're 0/3 for YouTube, with NetSurf even more broken here than WebPositive or Otter were. Jim Salter
  • NetSurf rendered Vimeo—and several other sites we tried—as entirely empty frames. It finished in only 0.3 seconds though! Jim Salter

I tried every graphical Web browser offered in Haiku—the default system-installed WebPositive, the Haiku Depot featured apps Otter Browser and NetSurf, and the non-featured app "Dooble." None was capable of correctly rendering even a small selection of modern must-have sites.

WebPositive couldn't render the Ars front page correctly. The next browser we tried, Otter, did a better job with Ars—but Otter failed to render video in either YouTube or Vimeo.

NetSurf, the remaining "featured" Web browser, is the most broken of the lot. It turned the Ars front page into a quasi-random jumble of images and CSS elements, failed to render Vimeo at all, and turned YouTube into a never-ending selection of black boxes and gray bars, with no text visible at all.

Dooble didn't seem to have any functional Javascript support at all. When I checked its preferences, I discovered that Javascript was off entirely by default—but turning it on again didn't have any visible effect. Gmail still complained about Javascript being disabled—and most other sites were just plain broken.

At this point, I left the Haiku VM and hit the Internet in a modern browser, hoping to find a way to get Firefox or Chromium running. This appeared to be a fool's errand—the closest thing I found was a 2016 forum thread declaring that "we have had Bezilla for a long time" and, based on Firefox 1.8, it was getting rather stale. Coming back to the Haiku VM and Haiku Depot, I looked for a Bezilla package, but it seems to have been abandoned without a trace.

The modern Web, clearly, is effectively inaccessible from Haiku.

Haiku is minimalist. HaiRead More – Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Twitter users are exposing pro-Russian sentiment in China, and Beijing is not happy

Published

on

Anonymous Twitter users are exposing the extreme nationalism and pro-Russian sentiment circulating online in China — and Beijing is not happy about it.

Scores of screen-grabbed posts from China’s most popular social media platforms have been translated and shared on Twitter in recent weeks, offering Western audiences a rare glimpse into the Chinese internet.
Among those posts: a prominent military blog falsely claiming a Russian attack on a train station in Kramatorsk was actually carried out by Ukraine, a well known media commentator dismissing the atrocities in Bucha, and a vlogger with hundreds of thousands of followers using a misogynistic term for Ukraine.
The posts appear courtesy of anonymous Twitter users who say their aim is to expose Western audiences to the true extent of pro-Russian or nationalistic content on China’s heavily censored platforms.
They often come under the hashtag of “The Great Translation Movement,” or shared by an account with the same name run by a decentralized, anonymous team that crowdsources the collection and translation of popular posts on Ukraine and other hot topics, according to an administrator interviewed by CNN. Many, but not all, appear to have been widely liked or shared within China — selection criteria cited by the administrator.
Since the account’s launch in early March it has already made plenty of friends and enemies — attracting both 116,000 followers (and counting) and a slew of criticism from China’s state-run media.
The movement was formed in response to China’s alleged hypocrisy in portraying itself as neutral on Ukraine, even while its state and social media circulated pro-Russian narratives, the administrator told CNN.
“We want the outside world to at least know what is going on inside, because we don’t think there could be any change made from inside,” said the administrator, who requested anonymity due to security concerns.

In bad faith?

China’s state media has lashed out against what it decries as “cherry picked content.” The overseas arm of the People’s Daily — the mouthpiece of China’s ruling Communist Party — has claimed the translators behind the movement are guilty of attributing the “extreme remarks” of some netizens to the “whole country.”
The nationalistic Global Times newspaper has accused the group of being “Chinese-speaking bad faith actors” and one of its opinion writers claimed the group included “foreign hostile forces” perpetuating “psychological warfare against China.”
Outside China, media experts caution the posts do not show a holistic view of public opinion in China and appear to at least partially be selected for shock value — but could still be useful in bringing these elements of China’s media sphere to light.
Critics also say the group’s tweets show evidence of its own bias — such as in posts that use a term comparing China to Nazi Germany.
Posts which gain traction on China’s social media must be seen in light of its highly censored environment, where nationalistic voices thrive and liberal ones have largely retreated or been censored, experts say.
But the administrator who spoke to CNN said the point was to highlight the visibility of such posts — some coming from popular influencers, comments receiving thousands of likes or from prominent commenstators, and even government-backed news outlets.
“Our goal is to raise awareness about the state of public opinion in China, whether it is purely the result of spontaneous interactions (or) the result of government censorship,” the administrator said.
“We want to counter the effort of the Chinese state-affiliated media by showing the West some content they do not want to show.”

Dual messaging

The resistance against the group from China’s state media highlights the sensitivities around how China wants to present itself on the world stage, especially at a time when it has been attempting to walk a diplomatic tightrope between Russia and the West over Ukraine.
China has often sought to present two different narratives — one for domestic audiences and another for those overseas. This is made possible through both a language barrier and an online ecosystem that bans apps like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The Great Translation Movement breaks down both of these barriers.
“Even before the social media era, the way China talks internally through its state media is something it doesn’t appreciate being parsed and translated for the world,” said David Bandurski, director of the China Media Project, a research program in partnership with the Journalism & Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong.
And when it comes to Ukraine, China has sought to portray itself — at least to overseas audiences — as unaligned and invested in calling for peace. But its media coverage back home tells a different story, Bandurski said.
“If you just look at (state) media coverage, it’s really hard to talk about neutrality … Everything they have said is amplifying disinformation and aligning with Russia in terms of narratives.”
While the tone of state-backed media is clear, experts say it is difficult to gauge public opinion in China simply by looking at social media, even when it comes to popular influencers or viral posts.
Like anywhere in the world, views on social media can be extreme. In China, heavy manipulation and censorship often amplifies select voices.
“The authorities certainly have an interest in promoting their preferred narrative online, and they have the technical and political means to unapologetically ‘guide public opinion,'” said Florian Schneider, director of the Leiden Asia Center in The Netherlands.
“We should also not underestimate the power of social media algorithms: as pro-Russia statements become mainstream, they receive ever more likes and shares, which makes them more visible,” he said.

Suppressed voices, echo chambers

The situation is complicated: Beijing too has reason to be wary of ultra-nationalist voices, which platforms sometimes censor. And while nationalist rhetoric has become more dominant online in recent years, the loudest voices may not show a majority.
Bandurski said that an analogy would be looking at ultra-conservative voices in the US media environment, and assuming that was representative of the American perspective.
“So the danger is this kind of echo chamber of content, which we might assume is representative of China and its perspective, and it’s really a lot more complicated than that,” he said.
Maria Repnikova, director of the Center for Global Information Studies at Georgia State University, said when it comes to Ukraine there have been “alternative voices talking about the war…but they’re not as dominant or as loud or as visible.” Their posts may either be censored or hard to detect as social media users may express dissenting views through code and allusion.
She also asks if things would be different if images of bombarded cities of Ukraine or the atrocities in Bucha were not restricted in China.
“If people could see all of those images and scenes, would that be a different story? Would different voices pick up?”
The Great Translation Movement administrator said they hoped that the movement could help push Beijing to tone down the rhetoric on these platforms so that there would be room for more voices.
“In today’s Chinese mainstream discourse there is a very limited space for people who have a rational mind to speak,” the administrator said.
“Even if you speak out and if it doesn’t get deleted, you are still going to be spammed…and people are going to say you are a spy… the dignity of people themselves is destroyed.”

Continue Reading

Tech

BLACKBERRY PHONES TO STOP WORKING AS COMPANY FINALLY PULLS PLUG

Published

on

independent– BlackBerry phones, once the height of mobile devices, are finally being shut off.

The company announced that services for the older devices will be brought to an end on 4 January. At that point, they will “no longer reliably function”, BlackBerry said, and will be unable to get data, texts or make phone calls, including to emergency numbers.

It is just the latest in a series of endings for the once equally beloved and hated name, which helped drive the mobile revolution and was at the forefront of business and technology. While the BlackBerry has been declared dead a number of times before, the latest move means that the phones themselves will actually stop working.

In 2016, after its phones had been replaced largely by smartphones from Apple and others, BlackBerry announced that it had transitioned away from phones and into making software and that it would focus on providing security tools to companies and governments. It has sold the BlackBerry brand to other companies, who have created devices bearing the name.

In 2020, BlackBerry said that with that move complete, it would start taking offline the legacy services that allowed those old devices to keep working. Phones that run any of BlackBerry’s own operating systems – BlackBerry 7.1 OS and earlier, BlackBerry 10 software – were given an “end of life or termination date” at the start of 2022.

Next week, that date will finally arrive and support will end. While the phones will still be able to perform some of their functions without BlackBerry’s services, many of their central features will be removed, and the phones will not work reliably.

BlackBerry said the support was being removed in recognition of the fact that it now works in security software and that the old products did not reflect its business. It had prolonged support in the years since that transition “as an expression of thanks to our loyal partners and customers”, it said.

Continue Reading

Tech

70 Jupiter-sized ‘rogue planets’ discovered in our galaxy

Published

on

independent– A team of astronomers discovered at least 70 ‘rogue’ planets in our galaxy, the largest collection ever found to date.

While conventional planets (like those in our Solar System) orbit a star, rogue planets roam freely without travelling around a nearby star.

“We did not know how many to expect and are excited to have found so many,” said Núria Miret-Roig, an astronomer at the Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Bordeaux.

­It would usually be impossible to detect rogue planets because they are hard to spot far from a star’s light. One key fact of their existence made them visible: these planets still give off enough heat to glow millions of years after their creation, making them visible to powerful telescopes.

This heat allowed the 70 planets – each with masses close to that of Jupiter – to be discovered in the Scorpius and Ophiuchus constellations.

“We measured the tiny motions, the colours and luminosities of tens of millions of sources in a large area of the sky,” explained Ms Miret-Roig. “These measurements allowed us to securely identify the faintest objects in this region, the rogue planets.”

The astronomers’ study suggests there could be many more elusive, starless planets yet to be discovered, numbering in the billions in the Milky Way alone.

By studying these planets, astronomers believe they could unlock clues as to how the mysterious objects come to be. It is hypothesised they are generated from the collapse of gas clouds too small to create stars, but they could also have been ejected from a parent system.

“These objects are extremely faint and little can be done to study them with current facilities,” says Hervé Bouy, another astronomer at the Laboratoire d’Astrophysique. “The ELT [Extremely Large Telescope, currently being built in Chile] will be absolutely crucial to gathering more information about most of the rogue planets we have found.”

The exact number of rogue planets discovered is vague, because the observations made by the researchers do not allow them to measure the mass of the objects. Bodies with a mass 13 times greater than that of Jupiter are unlikely to be planets, but relying on brightness makes this figure unclear.

The brightness of these objects is also related to age, as the older the planet is the dimmer it will be. The brightest objects in the sample could have a mass greater than the upper limit but be older and therefore dimmer. Researchers estimate there could be as many as 100 more planets yet to be discovered because of this uncertainty.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 , madridjournals.com