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Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s death sentence tossed out by appeals court

BOSTON: A federal appeals court on Friday (Jul 31) overturned Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's death penalty sentence for helping carry out the 2013 attack, which killed three people and wounded more than 260 others.

Tsarnaev and his older brother set off a pair of homemade pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line of the world-renowned race, tearing through the packed crowd and causing many people to lose legs.

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The 1st US Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston upheld much of Tsarnaev's conviction but ordered a lower-court judge to hold a new trial strictly over what sentence Tsarnaev should receive for the death penalty-eligible crimes he was convicted of.

A spokeswoman for US Attorney Andrew Lelling said his office is reviewing the decision and will have more to say "in the coming days and weeks." A lawyer for Tsarnaev did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

US Circuit Judge O Rogeriee Thompson, writing for the court, said the trial judge "fell short" in conducting the jury selection process and ensuring it could winnow out partial jurors exposed to pretrial publicity surrounding the high-profile case.

Thompson said the pervasive news coverage of the bombings and their aftermath featured "bone-chilling" photos and videos of Tsarnaev, now 27, and his brother carrying backpacks at the marathon and of those injured and killed near its finish line.

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The trial judge allowed his jury to include jurors who had "already formed an opinion that Dzhokhar was guilty – and he did so in large part because they answered 'yes' to the question whether they could decide this high-profile case based on the evidence."

Thompson stressed the limits of the court's ruling. "Make no mistake: Dzhokhar will spend his remaining days locked up in prison, with the only matter remaining being whether he will die by execution," she said.

Tsarnaev is being held at the United States' "Supermax" prison in Florence, Colorado, a site so remote and well secured that it is nicknamed the "Alcatraz of the Rockies."

Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan sparked five days of panic in Boston on Apr 15, 2013, when they detonated two homemade pressure cooker bombs at the marathon's finish line and then went into hiding.

Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is pictured in this file handout photo presented as evidence by the US Attorney's Office in Boston, Massachusetts on Mar 23, 2015. (Photo: US Attorney's Office in Boston/Handout via Reuters)

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Three nights later, as they attempted to flee the city, they sparked a new round of terror in Boston when they hijacked a car and then shot dead Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier. Tsarnaev's brother died later that night after a gunfight with police, which ended when Dzhokhar ran him over with a stolen car.

HOUSE-TO-HOUSE MANHUNT

Police then locked down Boston and most surrounding communities for almost 24 hours, with heavily armed officers conducting house-to-house searches through the suburb ofRead More – Source