Australia

Great Boulder Resources extends Blue Poles gold discovery to 600 metres strike length

Great Boulder Resources Ltd (ASX:GBR) has received new assay results from aircore drilling at the Whiteheads Project near Kalgoorlie which have extended the discovery at Blue Poles prospect to more than 600 metres.

First-pass aircore (AC) drilling intersected gold over 600 metres of strike and over 70 metres in width at the southern end of the discovery and mineralisation remains open and untested along strike.

Blue Poles now extends over more than 600 metres on a north-south trend, coincident with a local magnetic high, with the drilling also confirming further end-of-hole mineralisation.

Blue Poles results

The program comprised a total of 69 holes for 3,121 metres of drill advance targeting the Blue Poles, Gindalbie, Whiteheads Dam and Lindsays South prospects.

New results from Blue Poles include:

  • 16 metres at 0.50 g/t gold from 32 metres to end-of-hole (EOH), including 4 metres at 1.13 g/t; and
  • 17 metres at 0.42 g/t from 32 metres to EOH.

To put the grades into context, AC drilling is looking for gold anomalism from surface to the top of fresh rock and any anomalous gold at the end of the hole, which is the fresh rock interface, is positive as it represents primary gold below the supergene horizon.

“Extremely positive results”

Great Boulder managing director Andrew Paterson said: “Blue Poles is looking extremely positive at this early stage.

“To have gold grades above 400 parts per billion and up to 2 g/t over a 600 metres strike length is hugely exciting.

“And with the prospect broadening to over 70 metres wide at the western end of the last fence of holes, we dont yet know how big its going to be."

Open at both ends

The mineralised zone remains open along strike at both ends and also laterally to the west on the southern-most line with additional fences of AC drilling planned to confirm the total extent of this anomaly.

The smaller programs at Whiteheads Dam, Gindalbie and Lindsays South returned anomalous intersections, wiRead More – Source