Connect with us

Australia

Venturex to begin drilling Sulphur Springs Copper-Zinc Project tomorrow

Venturex Resources Ltd (ASX:VXR) plans to start drilling this week at its 100%-owned Sulphur Springs Copper-Zinc Project in Western Australia.

The contractor is on-site preparing for the drilling, which is expected to start tomorrow, after an unavoidable delay to exploration activities.

Drilling is designed to follow-up on strong results generated from 2019 drilling at the advanced Breakers prospect as well as to test the Heli-borne Electromagnetic (HEM) target XA8, where previous drilling intersected anomalous nickel-chromium mineralisation.

According to the company, XA8 is the first high-potential target within proximity to existing resources.

Drilling program[hhmc]
Venturex plans to start drilling at XA8 with two holes to test the down-plunge and along-strike continuation of a DHEM target and to further explore associated nickel-chromium mineralisation previously intersected.

The strongly anomalous nickel-chromium/cobalt mineral assemblage is hosted within a favourable mafic/ul..

Published

on

Venturex Resources Ltd (ASX:VXR) plans to start drilling this week at its 100%-owned Sulphur Springs Copper-Zinc Project in Western Australia.

The contractor is on-site preparing for the drilling, which is expected to start tomorrow, after an unavoidable delay to exploration activities.

Drilling is designed to follow-up on strong results generated from 2019 drilling at the advanced Breakers prospect as well as to test the Heli-borne Electromagnetic (HEM) target XA8, where previous drilling intersected anomalous nickel-chromium mineralisation.

According to the company, XA8 is the first high-potential target within proximity to existing resources.

Drilling program

Venturex plans to start drilling at XA8 with two holes to test the down-plunge and along-strike continuation of a DHEM target and to further explore associated nickel-chromium mineralisation previously intersected.

The strongly anomalous nickel-chromium/cobalt mineral assemblage is hosted within a favourable mafic/ultramafic intrusive unit that is interpreted to be highly prospective to host nickel-sulphide style mineralisation.

Breakers prospect

This will be followed at Breakers with four holes designed to follow-up along-strike and down-plunge continuation of massive sulphide mineralisation intersected at Breakers Main Gossan, including a thick, high-grade intersection of 18 metres at 7.75 zinc.

The company also plans to drill an additional two -holes at tRead More – Source

Continue Reading

Australia

Kylie Moore-Gilbert: Academic thanks supporters after Iran ‘nightmare’

Published

on

By

A British-Australian academic freed from an Iran jail last week has thanked friends and supporters for helping her to endure the “unrelenting nightmare”.

In her first statement since arriving back in Australia, Kylie Moore-Gilbert said she had “no words to express the depth of my gratitude”.

Dr Moore-Gilbert was arrested in Iran in September 2018 and had been serving a 10-year sentence on spying charges.

She was released in a prisoner swap for three Iranians, Tehran said.

The Melbourne University lecturer has consistently denied the accusations against her.

She had been travelling on an Australian passport in 2018 when she was detained at Tehran airport as she tried to leave following a conference.

Concerns for her wellbeing escalated in August when news emerged that she had been transferred to Qarchak, a notorious prison in the desert.

On Tuesday, Dr Moore-Gilbert said it was “heartening to hear that my friends and colleagues were speaking up and hadn’t forgotten me”.

“It gave me so much hope and strength to endure what had seemed like a never-ending, unrelenting nightmare,” she said in a statement posted online, adding that she was “touched” and “totally blown away” by the support.

On news of her release last week, Dr Moore-Gilbert’s family said they were “relieved and ecstatic” that she was free. She arrived back in Australia on a flight to the capital, Canberra, on Friday.

Last Thursday, Dr Moore-Gilbert said Australian officials had worked “tirelessly” to secure her freedom. She thanked them and other supporters who had “meant the world to me” while in detention.

The Cambridge-educated scholar – who was tried in secret – had endured “over 800 days of incredible hardship”, her family said.

“We cannot convey the overwhelming happiness that each of us feel at this incredible news,” they said in a statement released by the Australian government.

According to Iranian state media, she was exchanged for three Iranian citizens who had been detained in Thailand over a 2012 bomb plot in Bangkok, apparently aimed at Israel.

Thai authorities, however, have not confirmed that the three Iranians were exchanged with anyone.

‘I was never a spy’

In letters smuggled out of Tehran’s Evin prison earlier this year, Dr Moore-Gilbert said she had “never been a spy” and feared for her mental health. She said she had rejected an offer from Iran to become a spy.

“I am not a spy. I have never been a spy, and I have no interest to work for a spying organisation in any country,” she wrote.

She was later visited by Australia’s ambassador to Iran, Lyndall Sachs, who reported that she was “well”.

Dr Moore-Gilbert was reported to have spent long periods in solitary confinement and undertaken hunger strikes while in detention.

Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne said the release “was achieved through diplomatic engagement with the Iranian government”.

Iran has detained a number of foreign nationals and Iranian dual citizens in recent years, many of them on spying charges. Human rights groups have accused Tehran of using the cases as leverage to try to gain concessions from other countries.

British-Iranian charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was jailed on spying charges in 2016. She has always maintained her innocence.

 

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55139933

Continue Reading

Australia

Abdul Nacer Benbrika: Australia revokes citizenship of terror plotter

Published

on

By

Australia has cancelled the citizenship of an Algerian-born Muslim cleric convicted of planning a series of terror attacks in 2005.

Abdul Nacer Benbrika was jailed for 15 years in 2009 and is eligible for release from next month.

But Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton said it was “appropriate” to revoke his citizenship to protect Australians.

The move makes Benbrika the first person to be stripped of Australian citizenship while still in the country.

His lawyer has declined to comment on the government’s decision, ABC News reports.

“If it’s a person who’s posing a significant terrorist threat to our country, then we’ll do whatever is possible within Australian law to protect Australians,” Mr Dutton told reporters in Brisbane.

Under Australian law, the government can only strip people of citizenship if they are dual citizens, ensuring they will not be left stateless.

Last year Australia’s national security agency Asio raised concerns about this government power, saying it “may have unintended or unforeseen adverse security outcomes”.

Benbrika, who has lived in Australia since 1989, was arrested in 2005 and convicted of being a member of a terrorist organisation and leading its activities.

Six others were also convicted of joining the group, which had planned multiple attacks, including one on an Australian rules football final which attracts nearly 100,000 people every year in Melbourne.

Benbrika’s sentence includes a 12-year non-parole period that expired on 5 November. But Australia’s government has applied to Victoria state’s Supreme Court for a continuing detention order to extend his time in prison.

Under such orders, people convicted of terrorism offences can be held in prison for up to three years after their sentence finishes.

Victoria’s Supreme Court has so far granted two temporary, 28-day extensions to keep Benrika behind bars.

Lawyers for Benbrika have appealed against his ongoing detention.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55069037

Continue Reading

Australia

Covid: Vaccination will be required to fly, says Qantas chief

Published

on

By

International air travellers will in future need to prove they have been vaccinated against Covid-19 in order to board Qantas flights, the airline says.

The Australian flag carrier’s boss, Alan Joyce, said the move would be “a necessity” when vaccines are available.

“I think that’s going to be a common thing talking to my colleagues in other airlines around the globe,” he said.

Australia shut down its international borders early in the pandemic and required those returning to quarantine.

The country has more recently relied on lockdowns, widespread testing and aggressive contact tracing to push daily infections nationwide close to zero.

In an interview with Australia’s Nine Network on Monday, Mr Joyce said Qantas was looking at ways of changing its terms and conditions for international travellers as the industry, which has been hit hard by travel restrictions, looks at ways of moving forward.

“We will ask people to have a vaccination before they can get on the aircraft… for international visitors coming out and people leaving the country we think that’s a necessity,” he told the broadcaster.

In August, Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison said it was likely that any successful vaccine would become “as mandatory as you could possibly make it”.

“There are always exemptions for any vaccine on medical grounds, but that should be the only basis,” he told radio station 3AW.

That same month, Qantas reported an annual loss of almost A$2bn ($1.46bn; £1bn) because of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Mr Joyce said at the time that trading conditions were the worst in the airline’s 100-year history and that “the impact of Covid on all airlines is clear – it’s devastating”.

On Monday, the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) reopened its border with neighbouring Victoria for the first time since infections soared in Victoria’s state capital, Melbourne, in July.

Flights between the city and the NSW capital Sydney – normally one of the world’s busiest routes – had been cancelled.

Arriving in Sydney on a Qantas flight for the first time in months, passengers were greeted by people at the terminal holding up signs that read “welcome back”.

More than 20 additional flights were scheduled between the two states on Monday.

“Today is the day I get to meet my four-month-old grandson for the first time,” one passenger told the BBC.

Australia has recorded about 900 coronavirus-related deaths and almost 28,000 infections in total.

Read from source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55048438

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 , madridjournals.com