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Spain records historic fall in unemployment following end of state of alarm

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The Spanish job market is steadily recovering from the economic fallout of the coronavirus crisis, according to data presented on Wednesday by the Labor and Social Security ministries. These figures showed that the number of people registered as unemployed in Spain fell to 3,781,250 in May – a drop of 129,378 since April. This is the largest monthly fall ever recorded in the statistical series, which dates back to 1996. The last time a similar drop was seen was in 2017.

The historic fall in jobless numbers coincided with the end of the state of alarm on May 9, which saw coronavirus restrictions, such as nighttime curfews and a ban on inter-regional travel, lifted. This in turn boosted activity in sectors such as tourism and the hospitality industry.

Spain is a long way from where it was in February, when unemployment numbers broke the four-million mark. This figure began to decline in April, and the fall was consolidated in May, as the Covid-19 vaccination campaign gathered speed and restrictions were eased.

“This historical and magnificent data point is not due to the success of the government or the [Labor] Ministry, but rather of the Spanish people, who together have been able to face down the biggest crisis in history while maintaining the productive process,” said Joaquín Pérez Rey, the secretary of state for employment and social economy, while presenting the figures.

The number of Social Security contributors, considered a sign of job creation, also continues to rise. In May, the average number of contributors was 19,267,221 – up 211,932 on the average in April, for a monthly rise of 1.11%. “The Spanish economy has entered a new phase, the recovery is underway, and that is what all economic indicators are telling us,” said Economy Minister Nadia Calviño on Wednesday at the opening of the 2021 Aslan Congress on digital transformation in Madrid.

But the number of people registered as jobless does not include those on the government’s ERTE job retention scheme, which allows employers to temporarily send staff home or reduce their working hours. According to Social Security figures released on Wednesday, there were 542,142 workers on the ERTE program in May – down from 638,283 in April. This is the lowest figure since May 2020, when 3.6 million people were on the furlough scheme – the highest figure of the statistical series. Since then, 85% of furloughed workers have been reincorporated into the workforce.

As the number of workers on an ERTE falls, so too has government spending on the job retention scheme. In May, €632 million went to the program, the lowest figure since the beginning of the pandemic. The total cost of the scheme since April 2020 stands at €17.74 billion.

The ERTE job retention scheme has been extended until September 30, but experts say it is likely the program will be extended again, although it is not yet known how or to what degree this will happen. “As long as it remains necessary and we are hit by the crisis, this support is going to be available. Businesses and workers need security,” said Labor Minister Yolanda Díaz during a radio interview with the Catalan station RAC1.

The recovery of the job market in May was seen across all sectors: agriculture recorded the biggest fall in unemployment, with a drop of 4.78%, followed by the services sector (-3.39%), industry (-3.05%) and construction (-2.71%). But the biggest improvement was recorded in the under-25 age group. In this demographic, the number of people unemployed fell by 32,990 in May, a drop of 9.27% and triple the overall fall. Meanwhile, the Spanish regions that saw the largest decline in jobless numbers were Andalusia (-28,561), Catalonia (-15,368) and Valencia (-12,385).

“There are indicators that are telling us that we are on a good path, but that we are not going fast enough,” said Florentino Felgueroso, an expert in economics at Oviedo University. According to Felgueroso, the number of Social Security contributors is yet to reach pre-pandemic levels. “This May there were two million contributors, but in the same month in 2019, there were 2.6 million, 600,000 more, which is nearly a fourth,” he said. “This warns us that the [economic] engine is still at half throttle.”

And it’s a similar story for new contracts, said Felgueroso, who pointed out that more than 1.5 million were signed last month, compared to 2.1 million in May 2019. “This is where an improvement in the trend is expected in the coming months, especially in June, which is when decisions will begin to be made about the summer season,” he explained.

A total of 1,545,308 new contracts were signed in May, up 694,691 from the same month in 2020. This represents a rise of 81.67%. But over-reliance on temporary contracts continues to be a problem – 84.9% of all contracts signed in May were temporary, while only 10.1% were permanent hires.

With respect to self-employed workers, who have been among those hardest hit by the pandemic, the latest data also shows gains since April. The number of self-employed rose to 3,307,938 in May, up 15,006 from the previous month. “The May figures on unemployment and Social Security contributors are very positive, and they are in accord with what traditionally happens in the month of May without a pandemic,” said Lorenzo Amor, the president of the National Federation of Self-Employed Workers (ATA).

But Eduardo Abad, the president of the Self-Employed Workers Union (UPTA), was less optimistic: “You have to take into account that the figures for self-employment have been very negative, so it is to be expected that this situation would slowly improve.”

 

Read from source: https://english.elpais.com/economy_and_business/2021-06-02/spain-records-historic-fall-in-unemployment-following-end-of-state-of-alarm.html

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Spain reports first case of Omicron Covid variant

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thelocal– Spain said Monday it had detected its first case of the new Omicron strain of Covid-19 in a man who had recently arrived from South Africa.

The 51-year-old was tested when he arrived at Madrid airport on Sunday via Amsterdam and was found to be positive, the regional government of Madrid said in a statement.

“The patient has light symptoms and is undergoing quarantine,” the statement added.

Earlier on Monday, Madrid’s Gregorio Maranon Hospital tweeted that its microbiology service had detected the first case of the Omicron variant in Spain, without giving further details.

The World Health Organization has listed Omicron as a “variant of concern” and countries around the world are now restricting travel from southern Africa, where the new strain was first detected, and taking other new precautions.

The WHO says it could take several weeks to know if there are significant changes in transmissibility, severity or implications for Covid vaccines, tests and treatments.

Several other European nations, including Belgium, Britain and Germany have detected cases of the variant, which was first detected in South Africa.

On Friday, Spanish authorities suspended flights with South Africa and Botswana in reaction to growing concerns over the new variant which was first detected in the South African city of Pretoria.

The following day, Spain’s Health Ministry put Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe on its new high-risk list.

Travellers who are able to reach Spain from these nations will have to present a negative PCR or NAAT test taken within 72 hours prior to travel to Spain even if they are fully vaccinated.

They must also go into quarantine for 10 days upon arrival in Spain, or for their whole stay if it’s under 10 days.

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Spanish researchers pave way for fair play in global Covid testing and research

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thelocal– The World Health Organisation described the accord as the first transparent, global, non-exclusive licence for a Covid-19 health tool, that should help towards correcting the “devastating global inequity” in access.

The deal brings the Spanish National Research Council CSIC together with the global Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) and the WHO’s Covid-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) knowledge-sharing platform.

“The aim of the licence is to facilitate the rapid manufacture and commercialisation of CSIC’s Covid-19 serological test worldwide,” the WHO said.

The test effectively detects anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies developed in response to either a Covid-19 infection or a vaccine.

CSIC, one of Europe’s main public research institutions, will provide the MPP or prospective licencees with know-how and training.

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus described the licence, which will be royalty-free for low and middle-income countries, as “the kind of open and transparent licence we need to move the needle on access during and after the pandemic”.

He added: “I urge developers of Covid-19 vaccines, treatments and diagnostics to follow this example and turn the tide… on the devastating
global inequity this pandemic has spotlighted.”

C-TAP was founded in May 2020 as a platform for developers of Covid-19 tools to share knowledge and intellectual property.

Set up during the scramble for Covid vaccines and treatments, the health technology repository was first suggested by Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado.

The information pool was intended as a voluntary global bank for IP and open-sourced data as part of a common front against the new coronavirus.

However, as it turned out, rival pharmaceutical companies have largely kept their findings to themselves rather than sharing them as global public goods.

Tuesday’s deal “shows that solidarity and equitable access can be achieved”, said Alvarado.

CSIC president Rosa Menéndez said she hoped the move would serve as an example for other research organisations.

‘Preposterous’ tests hoarding

The medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said the test could quantify three different types of antibodies — and crucially, differentiate vaccinated people from those with natural Covid infection.

“This feature will become very important for measuring the number of Covid-19 cases in countries and the impact of control measures,” it said.

In welcoming CSIC’s move, MSF diagnostics adviser Stijn Deborggraeve said it was “preposterous” in a global pandemic that tests were being monopolised by “a handful of privileged people and countries”.

The Geneva-based MPP is a UN-backed international organisation that works to facilitate the development of medicines for low- and middle-income nations.

The antibody test licensing accord is the third Covid-related deal that the global pool has struck in a month.

Last week, the MPP reached an agreement with US pharmaceutical giant Pfizer to make its prospective antiviral Covid-19 pill available more cheaply in 95 low- and middle-income countries via sub-licensing to generic drug manufacturers.

The MPP signed a similar deal last month with Pfizer’s US rival Merck for its prospective oral antiviral medicine molnupiravir.

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In 2 days, 10 migrants die trying to reach Spanish islands

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euronews– Spanish rescuers say 10 migrants have died while trying to reach the Canary Islands archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean.

Rescuers said Monday they found a migrant boat drifting 200 kilometres from the Canary Islands and saved 40 people but recovered two bodies.

The boat is believed to have departed from Dakhla on the coast of Western Sahara five days ago. A Spanish rescue plane spotted it drifting in the Atlantic Ocean. At least five people had to be evacuated by helicopter to a hospital on the island of Gran Canaria for urgent medical attention. The other survivors were being brought back to the port of Arguineguín on the same island in one of Spain’s rescue ships.

Some 900 migrants have reportedly died or gone missing on the dangerous migration route from West Africa to the Canary Islands, according to the U.N. migration agency. Experts say even that number is an undercount as many migrant ships sink with no confirmation.

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