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China Wants US To ‘broaden Horizons’ Instead Of Fretting Over Hypersonic Missile: Reports

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republicworld– A day after the Financial Times reported about China nuclear-capable missile launch, Beijing’s mouthpiece Global Times in its editorial neither rebuffed the claim nor cleared the exact position of China’s recent launch. In its editorial, the Chinese stooge suggested the United States stop eyeing too much on China’s hypersonic missiles and asked to “broaden their horizons”.
Notably, the comments in the editorial section came in response to a Financial Times report which claimed that China had launched a nuclear-capable missile in August that travelled across the Earth at low orbit before narrowly missing its target. Citing multiple sources, the report claimed that the hypersonic missile was carried by a Long March rocket.

“The US generally has the ability to monitor global missile launches. If the FT report is to be believed, it means that there is a key new member in China’s nuclear deterrence system, which is a new blow to the US’ mentality of strategic superiority over China,” Global Times said in its editorial published on October 17. “The FT also reported that China has tested a new space capability with a hypersonic missile, citing sources. But if Chinese authorities do not voluntarily release such top defence secrets, others can only speculate based on technical monitoring methods,” added the Chinese mouthpiece.

‘China capable of countering any of Washington’s military aggression’: Report

In the editorial, it did not raise questions over the credibility of FT reports, however, it noted China’s unstoppable trend in developing military technology and strengthening the country economically. The report said it doesn’t need to engage in an “arms race” with the US  and said it is capable of countering any of Washington’s military aggression at its own pace. “China won’t have any will to globally challenge the US’ dominant position in the military sphere, and the US shouldn’t worry about losing its military hegemony,” added Global Times.

Chinese missiles testing has some historical patterns: Experts

“The US is very concerned about China’s nuclear development. There is no doubt that China has no plans to build a nuclear force of the same size as that of the US. In other words, we have no intention of launching a “nuclear arms race” with the US.”
The report said suggested Washington explore a political and security framework that can accommodate the major long-term interests of both countries. However, some of the political commentators have said that the recent developments were indicating a similar turn of events like the ones during the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the west in the 20th century.

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The White House is tapping oil reserves to try to bring down high gas prices

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npr– The United States plans to draw 50 million barrels of oil from its emergency oil reserves in coming months, a widely anticipated step aimed at trying to take the edge off high gas prices that have been hurting consumers at the pump — and hurting President Biden in the polls.

Inflation has emerged as a top political concern with voters, who have seen prices for gasoline and other staples surge in recent months. U.S. gas prices are at their highest level since 2014.

Biden has been talking with other leaders about the problem, and other major consumers — China, India, Japan, South Korea and the United Kingdom — will take similar steps to release oil from their stockpiles, the White House said on Tuesday.

In a Tuesday news conference announcing the decision, Biden said, “We’re taking action.”

“The big part of the reason Americans are facing high gas prices is because oil-producing countries and large companies have not ramped up the supply of oil quickly enough to meet the demand. And the smaller supply means higher prices globally — globally — for oil,” he said.

Biden warned that actions by the U.S. and other nations wouldn’t fix problems at the pump “overnight,” but said Americans could soon expect relief.

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Myanmar election body charges Suu Kyi with electoral fraud

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independent– Myanmar’s state election commission announced it is prosecuting the country’s ousted leader, Aung San Suu Kyi and 15 other senior political figures for alleged fraud in last November’s general election.

The announcement was published Tuesday in the state-run Global New Light of Myanmar newspaper and other official media.

Allegations of widespread electoral fraud were the main reason cited by the military for its Feb. 1 seizure of power that toppled Suu Kyi’s government. Her National League for Democracy party was about to begin a second five-year term in office after its landslide victory in the polls. The army-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party suffered unexpectedly heavy losses.

Independent observers, such as the Asian Network for Free Elections, found no evidence of substantive irregularities in the polls, though they criticized some aspects.

The action by the Union Election Commission could potentially result in Suu Kyi’s party being dissolved and unable to participate in a new election the military has promised will take place within two years of its takeover. However, the commission’s notice, dated Monday, did not specify which laws would be used to prosecute the accused.

In May, the military-appointed new head of the election commission said his agency would consider dissolving Suu Kyi’s former governing party for alleged involvement in electoral fraud and have its leaders charged with treason. Commission Chairman Thein Soe said an investigation had determined that the party had worked illegally with the government to give itself an advantage at the polls.

After taking power, the military dismissed the members of the election commission that had certified the results of last year’s poll and appointed new ones. It also detained members of the old commission, and, according to reports in independent Myanmar media, pressured them to state there had been election fraud.

The new commission declared last year’s election’s results invalid.

The new notice from the commission said Suu Kyi, former President Win Myint, other leading figures in her party and the commission’s former chairman were “involved in electoral processes, election fraud and lawless actions” related to the polls.

It accused 16 people of carrying out illegal actions, including compelling local election officials to obstruct military polling booths, threatening such officials in connection with advance voting for voters over 60 years old, forcing local officials to approve voting lists that included ineligible voters and interfering in campaigning to favor Suu Kyi’s party.

Suu Kyi is already on trial or charged in about a dozen criminal cases in which a conviction would almost certainly bar her from running for office again. Several of her top political allies also have been tried or are facing charges. Suu Kyi’s supporters as well as independent rights organizations contend that the cases are spurious and meant to discredit Suu Kyi and her party while legitimizing military rule.

Dissolving Suu Kyi’s party would follow a regional trend of dissolving popular political parties seen as a threat to governments in power.

Cambodia’s high court in 2017 dissolved the Cambodia National Rescue Party the sole credible opposition force, ahead of a 2018 general election.

Thailand’s Constitutional Court in 2020 dissolved the newly formed Future Forward Party, which had won the third highest number of seats in the lower house in the 2019 general election.

In both the Cambodian and Thai cases, the courts cited specific violations of the law for their rulings, but their actions were widely seen as reflecting political pressures.

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Capitol riot: Judge rejects Trump bid to withhold records

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bbc– A US judge has ruled a congressional committee investigating the Capitol riot can access some of ex-President Donald Trump’s White House records.

Mr Trump had argued the materials were covered by executive privilege, which protects the confidentiality of some White House communications.

The inquiry is trying to find out if Mr Trump had foreknowledge of the riot.

The ruling came on the day 10 Trump aides were issued with legal summonses to testify before lawmakers.

Hundreds of Mr Trump’s supporters stormed the Capitol building and disrupted the official certification of President Joe Biden’s election victory on 6 January this year.

The House of Representatives Select Committee wants to see a trove of phone records, visitor logs and other White House documents that could shed some light on the events leading up to the attack on Congress.

The former president had requested an injunction to keep the documents under wraps.

But US District Judge Tanya Chutkan ruled on Tuesday that the National Archives, the federal agency that holds Mr Trump’s White House records, should comply with the panel’s request.

  • Capitol riots timeline: How the day unfolded
  • Capitol riots: What we have learned six months on
  • Who stormed the Capitol?

Judge Chutkan, an Obama appointee, ruled that Mr Trump’s request for a preliminary injunction seemed to rest “on the notion that his executive power ‘exists in perpetuity'”.

“But Presidents are not kings, and Plaintiff is not President,” she added in the 39-page decision. The legal battle is likely to wind up at the Supreme Court.

Sixteen of Mr Trump’s closest aides have been subpoenaed in the past two days.

They include Kayleigh McEnany, the White House press secretary, Stephen Miller, who was Mr Trump’s senior adviser, Bill Stepien, campaign manager, Mark Meadows, former White House chief of staff, and Michael Flynn, former national security adviser.

Bennie Thompson, the Mississippi Democrat who chairs the House Select Committee, said in a statement he wants to know every detail about what happened on 6 January, and in the days leading up to it.

The committee expects the witnesses to “comply fully”, he added.

The panel has already subpoenaed Dan Scavino, former deputy chief of staff, and Steve Bannon, a former Trump strategist.

Mr Bannon refused to comply with the subpoena and was charged with contempt of Congress.

Following the Capitol riot, Mr Trump was impeached by Congress, but cleared by lawmakers of inciting an insurrection. More than 670 people have been arrested for the invasion of the Capitol complex.

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