Europe

In the latest turn in the controversy surrounding Poland's new Holocaust law Jaroslaw Sellim said he supported the call, a move which could trigger yet more tension with Israel and the country's own Jewish community.Sellim says that the story of the estimated 1.9 million non-Jewish Poles who were murdered by the Nazi regime has not been well documented enough in current museums."I think that the story of the fate of the Poles during World War Two, in the first phase — the destruction of our country by the Nazis and Soviets — and the second phase, when our country was under total occupation — deserves to be told and that the world should see this horrific loss," he told Poland's Radio One."It is enough to read the official German documents from the time and Hitler's famous book to know that after the Jews, who Hitler wanted to completely annihilate from Europe, the second phase of his plan included the Slavs and especially Poles."The plans were clear. First, eliminate the Polish elites which started in the first weeks and days of the war, and then to turn Poland into a country of undereducated slaves for the Nazis to serve as a nation of physical laborers to serve their masters."I believe that previously we lost the chance to tell this story in the current Museum of World War Two in Poland the current Museum doesn't fulfill this aim."Sellim's comments came in a response to a suggestion made by writer and academic Marek Kochan, for what he had called a 'Polocaust' museum, to be built in at article for the Polish daily newspaper Rzeczpospolita.While there is no indication that such a museum will be built, Sellim believes it if were, it would provide education for those he says are "very ignorant" of the suffering of the Poles."The situation that we are in today, this hard unnecessary discussion, which is hurtful mainly for the victims from both sides, the most important Jewish and Polish victims," he added."It is unfortunate for both Jews and Poles. And today we should invite guests and journalists from abroad who seem to be very ignorant on the matter to a Polish museum, where the whole story would be told, and a place like this doesn't exist where we can invite people at the moment."

'Growing wave of intolerance'

While there is a consensus among historians that certain Polish individuals and groups did collaborate with the Nazi occupiers, recent Polish governments have sought to challenge that narrative.The new law makes it illegal to accuse the Polish nation of complicity in crimes committed by Nazi Germany, including the Holocaust, It also prohibits terms such as "Polish death camps" in relation to Auschwitz and other such camps located in Nazi-occupied Poland. Violations would be punished by a fine or a jail sentence of up to three years.Read: Swastikas drawn on Polish embassy in IsraelSellim's comments are unlikely to reassure Poland's Jewish organizations, which say that the new law has led to a "growing wave of intolerance, xenophobia, and anti-Semitism," leaving many within the community feeling unsafe.On Tuesday, the country's chief rabbi, Michael Schudrich, told CNN that the fallout from the new law has been so fierce it has left many members of the Jewish community wondering if they are still welcome in Poland.Schudrich said the open letter was not a political move but more of an opportunity to show how the community is feeling."This is one of the most devastating effects of the past few weeks," Schudrich said.'It is devastating that such questions are asked and speaks to the fragility of the situation. It's not just the new law but the tone of the discussion with almost no reaction from leadership to that tone. A deafening silence by the leadership."Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki has been criticized for remarks on Jews in the Holocaust.During the Holocaust, 30,000 to 35,000 Polish Jews were saved with the help of non-Jewish Polish citizens, according to Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem.Yad Vashem has honored more Poles as Righteous Among the Nations — non-Jews who helped Jews during the Holocaust — than those of any other country, but Israel has accused Poland of attempting to rewrite history with the new law.Tensions reached a new level on Saturday Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki caused outrage at a security conference in Germany with comments that Jews were among the perpetrators of the Holocaust.A Polish government representative sought to clarity Morawiecki's remarks, insisting they were not "intended to deny the Holocaust, or charge the Jewish victims of the Holocaust with responsibility for what was a Nazi Germany-perpetrated genocide."Morawiecki's comments sparked fury in Israel, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu phoning his Polish counterpart to register his disgust.They also unnerved many Jews in Poland, where an estimated 10% of its 3.5 million Jews survived the Holocaust.Opinion: Poland's Holocaust law should terrify youMany of those who survived and their family members were forced to leave in 1968 in the midst of an "anti-Zionist" campaign in which the communist government blamed the Jewish community for economic problems. Many lost their jobs, were attacked in the press and had their citizenship revoked, losing the right ever to return to Poland.It was only until 1989 and the fall of communism that Polish Jews were allowed to return home.

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Europe

In a statement Tuesday, the international charity said former CEO Justin Forsyth was investigated twice after complaints from three women about his conduct in 2011 and 2015.On both occasions, the investigation led to "unreserved" apology from the chief executive and "the matters were closed," the statement said. The Save the Children allegations follow outrage over revelations that staff from British-based charity Oxfam abused their position of trust to engage in sexual acts with the people they were supposed to be helping.According to the BBC, which first reported the claims, Forsyth allegedly sent inappropriate text messages to young female staff about what they were wearing and how he felt about them.Forsyth left the charity at the end of January 2016 to take up a role as the deputy executive director at UNICEF.He's reported to have issued a separate statement Tuesday, saying he had made some "personal mistakes" during his time at Save the Children, and that he had thought "the issue closed many years ago.""I recognize that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues, which I now know caused offense and hurt," he said, according to the BBC.Sexual exploitation is widespread in the global aid sector, UK lawmakers toldUNICEF told CNN it is aware of the reports regarding the "past complaints" about Forsyth. In an email, UNICEF spokeswoman Najwa Mekki said, "We welcome Mr. Forsyth's decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr. Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action."Current Save the Children chief executive Kevin Watkins pledged a "root and branch review" of the charity's culture to check the safety of staff was being properly protected."The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018," a spokesman for Save the Children said in a statement."We apologize for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day."

Charities acknowledge sexual abuse issues

In February, Watkins told the House of Commons International Development Committee that sexual exploitation and abuse were a problem across the international aid sector.Earlier this week, Oxfam publicly released an internal report compiled in 2011 that details the organization's investigation into claims staffers had hired prostitutes while living in one of the charity's properties in Haiti.The report revealed that, during the investigation, three staff members accused of wrongdoing had "physically threatened and intimidated" a witness.In the end, four Oxfam employees were dismissed and three others resigned as a result of the investigation, including the former Haiti country director Roland van Hauwermeiren.The UK charity issued a formal apology to the Haiti government on Monday for their employees' behavior."Oxfam is grateful to the Haiti Government for allowing us the chance now to offer our humblest apologies and to begin explaining ourselves and start the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership, given our 40-year history with Haiti and its citizens," Simon Ticehurst, Oxfam's regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said in a statement.

Original Article

Europe

In a statement Tuesday, the international charity said former CEO Justin Forsyth was investigated twice after complaints from three women about his conduct in 2011 and 2015.On both occasions, the investigation led to "unreserved" apology from the chief executive and "the matters were closed," the statement said. The Save the Children allegations follow outrage over revelations that staff from British-based charity Oxfam abused their position of trust to engage in sexual acts with the people they were supposed to be helping.According to the BBC, which first reported the claims, Forsyth allegedly sent inappropriate text messages to young female staff about what they were wearing and how he felt about them.Forsyth left the charity at the end of January 2016 to take up a role as the deputy executive director at UNICEF.He's reported to have issued a separate statement Tuesday, saying he had made some "personal mistakes" during his time at Save the Children, and that he had thought "the issue closed many years ago.""I recognize that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues, which I now know caused offense and hurt," he said, according to the BBC.Sexual exploitation is widespread in the global aid sector, UK lawmakers toldUNICEF told CNN it is aware of the reports regarding the "past complaints" about Forsyth. In an email, UNICEF spokeswoman Najwa Mekki said, "We welcome Mr. Forsyth's decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr. Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action."Current Save the Children chief executive Kevin Watkins pledged a "root and branch review" of the charity's culture to check the safety of staff was being properly protected."The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018," a spokesman for Save the Children said in a statement."We apologize for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day."

Charities acknowledge sexual abuse issues

In February, Watkins told the House of Commons International Development Committee that sexual exploitation and abuse were a problem across the international aid sector.Earlier this week, Oxfam publicly released an internal report compiled in 2011 that details the organization's investigation into claims staffers had hired prostitutes while living in one of the charity's properties in Haiti.The report revealed that, during the investigation, three staff members accused of wrongdoing had "physically threatened and intimidated" a witness.In the end, four Oxfam employees were dismissed and three others resigned as a result of the investigation, including the former Haiti country director Roland van Hauwermeiren.The UK charity issued a formal apology to the Haiti government on Monday for their employees' behavior."Oxfam is grateful to the Haiti Government for allowing us the chance now to offer our humblest apologies and to begin explaining ourselves and start the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership, given our 40-year history with Haiti and its citizens," Simon Ticehurst, Oxfam's regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said in a statement.

Original Article

Europe

Profanities were scrawled across a noticeboard outside the embassy and a swastika had been drawn on the entrance gate. Israeli police have opened an investigation into the incident.Tensions between the two countries have ratcheted up since Poland passed a controversial new Holocaust-related bill earlier this month.The law, which, which makes it illegal to accuse the Polish nation of complicity in crimes committed by Nazi Germany, including the Holocaust, also bans the use of terms such as "Polish death camps" in relation to Auschwitz and other such camps located in Nazi-occupied Poland. Violations would be punished by a fine or a jail sentence of up to three years.Israel has been vociferous in its criticism of the new law, accusing Poland of attempting to rewrite history.But Morawiecki's comments on Saturday at a security conference in Munich prompted a fresh wave of anger.Replying to an Israeli journalist when questioned about whether a person could be imprisoned for claiming there were Polish collaborators in the Holocaust, Reuters reported Morawiecki as saying, "Of course it's not going to be punishable, not going to be seen as criminal, to say that there were Polish perpetrators, as there were Jewish perpetrators, as there were Russian perpetrators, as there were Ukrainian, not only German perpetrators."Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki has been fiercely criticized for his comments.The comments sparked an outcry from Israeli leaders, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who phoned Morawiecki to register his disgust.Netanyahu labeled the comments as "unacceptable" and insisted "there was no basis for comparing the actions of Poles during the Holocaust to those of Jews." Netanyahu added that the "distortion regarding Poland could not be corrected by means of another distortion."Israeli President Reuben Rivlin described Morawiecki's remarks as a "new low."Read: Poland's Holocaust law should terrify youA Polish government spokesperson sought to clarity Morawiecki's comments, insisting they were not "intended to deny the Holocaust, or charge the Jewish victims of the Holocaust with responsibility for what was a Nazi German perpetrated genocide.""The Prime Minister has repeatedly and categorically opposed denial of the Holocaust — the murder of European Jewry — as well as anti-Semitism in all its forms," the spokesperson said in a statement."Attempts to equate the crimes of Nazi German perpetrators with the actions of their victims — Jewish, Polish, Romani among others — who struggled for survival should be met with resolute, outright condemnation."Poland was the center of Ashkenazi Jewry before the Holocaust, with around 3.5 million Jews living in the country before the outbreak of World War II in 1939. By the end of the war, just 10% of the community remained. Six million Jews were killed in the Holocaust overall.Polish Holocaust law sows 'distortions,' Poland's chief rabbi saysAccording to Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem, between 30,000 and 35,000 Polish Jews were saved with the help of non-Jewish Polish citizens.Despite more Poles being honored as Righteous Among the Nations — non-Jews who helped Jews during the Holocaust — than any other country, there is a consensus among historians that certain Polish individuals and groups did collaborate with the Nazi occupiers. Recent Polish governments have sought to challenge that narrative.Earlier this month, Poland's deputy foreign minister Bartosz Cichocki told CNN that the new law was "not meant to revise the history whatsoever, this is meant to guard the truth about the Holocaust.""We have to realize that when he or she says that the Polish state or the Polish nation is responsible for the Holocaust, they diminish the responsibility of the real perpetrators," Cichocki added.

CNN's Oren Liebermann reported from Jerusalem. James Masters wrote from London.

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Europe

In the latest turn in the controversy surrounding Poland's new Holocaust law Jaroslaw Sellim said he supported the call, a move which could trigger yet more tension with Israel and the country's own Jewish community.Sellim says that the story of the estimated 1.9 million non-Jewish Poles who were murdered by the Nazi regime has not been well documented enough in current museums."I think that the story of the fate of the Poles during World War Two, in the first phase — the destruction of our country by the Nazis and Soviets — and the second phase, when our country was under total occupation — deserves to be told and that the world should see this horrific loss," he told Poland's Radio One."It is enough to read the official German documents from the time and Hitler's famous book to know that after the Jews, who Hitler wanted to completely annihilate from Europe, the second phase of his plan included the Slavs and especially Poles."The plans were clear. First, eliminate the Polish elites which started in the first weeks and days of the war, and then to turn Poland into a country of undereducated slaves for the Nazis to serve as a nation of physical laborers to serve their masters."I believe that previously we lost the chance to tell this story in the current Museum of World War Two in Poland the current Museum doesn't fulfill this aim."Sellim's comments came in a response to a suggestion made by writer and academic Marek Kochan, for what he had called a 'Polocaust' museum, to be built in at article for the Polish daily newspaper Rzeczpospolita.While there is no indication that such a museum will be built, Sellim believes it if were, it would provide education for those he says are "very ignorant" of the suffering of the Poles."The situation that we are in today, this hard unnecessary discussion, which is hurtful mainly for the victims from both sides, the most important Jewish and Polish victims," he added."It is unfortunate for both Jews and Poles. And today we should invite guests and journalists from abroad who seem to be very ignorant on the matter to a Polish museum, where the whole story would be told, and a place like this doesn't exist where we can invite people at the moment."

'Growing wave of intolerance'

While there is a consensus among historians that certain Polish individuals and groups did collaborate with the Nazi occupiers, recent Polish governments have sought to challenge that narrative.The new law makes it illegal to accuse the Polish nation of complicity in crimes committed by Nazi Germany, including the Holocaust, It also prohibits terms such as "Polish death camps" in relation to Auschwitz and other such camps located in Nazi-occupied Poland. Violations would be punished by a fine or a jail sentence of up to three years.Read: Swastikas drawn on Polish embassy in IsraelSellim's comments are unlikely to reassure Poland's Jewish organizations, which say that the new law has led to a "growing wave of intolerance, xenophobia, and anti-Semitism," leaving many within the community feeling unsafe.On Tuesday, the country's chief rabbi, Michael Schudrich, told CNN that the fallout from the new law has been so fierce it has left many members of the Jewish community wondering if they are still welcome in Poland.Schudrich said the open letter was not a political move but more of an opportunity to show how the community is feeling."This is one of the most devastating effects of the past few weeks," Schudrich said.'It is devastating that such questions are asked and speaks to the fragility of the situation. It's not just the new law but the tone of the discussion with almost no reaction from leadership to that tone. A deafening silence by the leadership."Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki has been criticized for remarks on Jews in the Holocaust.During the Holocaust, 30,000 to 35,000 Polish Jews were saved with the help of non-Jewish Polish citizens, according to Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem.Yad Vashem has honored more Poles as Righteous Among the Nations — non-Jews who helped Jews during the Holocaust — than those of any other country, but Israel has accused Poland of attempting to rewrite history with the new law.Tensions reached a new level on Saturday Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki caused outrage at a security conference in Germany with comments that Jews were among the perpetrators of the Holocaust.A Polish government representative sought to clarity Morawiecki's remarks, insisting they were not "intended to deny the Holocaust, or charge the Jewish victims of the Holocaust with responsibility for what was a Nazi Germany-perpetrated genocide."Morawiecki's comments sparked fury in Israel, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu phoning his Polish counterpart to register his disgust.They also unnerved many Jews in Poland, where an estimated 10% of its 3.5 million Jews survived the Holocaust.Opinion: Poland's Holocaust law should terrify youMany of those who survived and their family members were forced to leave in 1968 in the midst of an "anti-Zionist" campaign in which the communist government blamed the Jewish community for economic problems. Many lost their jobs, were attacked in the press and had their citizenship revoked, losing the right ever to return to Poland.It was only until 1989 and the fall of communism that Polish Jews were allowed to return home.

Original Article

Europe

In the latest turn in the controversy surrounding Poland's new Holocaust law Jaroslaw Sellim said he supported the call, a move which could trigger yet more tension with Israel and the country's own Jewish community.Sellim says that the story of the estimated 1.9 million non-Jewish Poles who were murdered by the Nazi regime has not been well documented enough in current museums."I think that the story of the fate of the Poles during World War Two, in the first phase — the destruction of our country by the Nazis and Soviets — and the second phase, when our country was under total occupation — deserves to be told and that the world should see this horrific loss," he told Poland's Radio One."It is enough to read the official German documents from the time and Hitler's famous book to know that after the Jews, who Hitler wanted to completely annihilate from Europe, the second phase of his plan included the Slavs and especially Poles."The plans were clear. First, eliminate the Polish elites which started in the first weeks and days of the war, and then to turn Poland into a country of undereducated slaves for the Nazis to serve as a nation of physical laborers to serve their masters."I believe that previously we lost the chance to tell this story in the current Museum of World War Two in Poland the current Museum doesn't fulfill this aim."Sellim's comments came in a response to a suggestion made by writer and academic Marek Kochan, for what he had called a 'Polocaust' museum, to be built in at article for the Polish daily newspaper Rzeczpospolita.While there is no indication that such a museum will be built, Sellim believes it if were, it would provide education for those he says are "very ignorant" of the suffering of the Poles."The situation that we are in today, this hard unnecessary discussion, which is hurtful mainly for the victims from both sides, the most important Jewish and Polish victims," he added."It is unfortunate for both Jews and Poles. And today we should invite guests and journalists from abroad who seem to be very ignorant on the matter to a Polish museum, where the whole story would be told, and a place like this doesn't exist where we can invite people at the moment."

'Growing wave of intolerance'

While there is a consensus among historians that certain Polish individuals and groups did collaborate with the Nazi occupiers, recent Polish governments have sought to challenge that narrative.The new law makes it illegal to accuse the Polish nation of complicity in crimes committed by Nazi Germany, including the Holocaust, It also prohibits terms such as "Polish death camps" in relation to Auschwitz and other such camps located in Nazi-occupied Poland. Violations would be punished by a fine or a jail sentence of up to three years.Read: Swastikas drawn on Polish embassy in IsraelSellim's comments are unlikely to reassure Poland's Jewish organizations, which say that the new law has led to a "growing wave of intolerance, xenophobia, and anti-Semitism," leaving many within the community feeling unsafe.On Tuesday, the country's chief rabbi, Michael Schudrich, told CNN that the fallout from the new law has been so fierce it has left many members of the Jewish community wondering if they are still welcome in Poland.Schudrich said the open letter was not a political move but more of an opportunity to show how the community is feeling."This is one of the most devastating effects of the past few weeks," Schudrich said.'It is devastating that such questions are asked and speaks to the fragility of the situation. It's not just the new law but the tone of the discussion with almost no reaction from leadership to that tone. A deafening silence by the leadership."Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki has been criticized for remarks on Jews in the Holocaust.During the Holocaust, 30,000 to 35,000 Polish Jews were saved with the help of non-Jewish Polish citizens, according to Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem.Yad Vashem has honored more Poles as Righteous Among the Nations — non-Jews who helped Jews during the Holocaust — than those of any other country, but Israel has accused Poland of attempting to rewrite history with the new law.Tensions reached a new level on Saturday Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki caused outrage at a security conference in Germany with comments that Jews were among the perpetrators of the Holocaust.A Polish government representative sought to clarity Morawiecki's remarks, insisting they were not "intended to deny the Holocaust, or charge the Jewish victims of the Holocaust with responsibility for what was a Nazi Germany-perpetrated genocide."Morawiecki's comments sparked fury in Israel, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu phoning his Polish counterpart to register his disgust.They also unnerved many Jews in Poland, where an estimated 10% of its 3.5 million Jews survived the Holocaust.Opinion: Poland's Holocaust law should terrify youMany of those who survived and their family members were forced to leave in 1968 in the midst of an "anti-Zionist" campaign in which the communist government blamed the Jewish community for economic problems. Many lost their jobs, were attacked in the press and had their citizenship revoked, losing the right ever to return to Poland.It was only until 1989 and the fall of communism that Polish Jews were allowed to return home.

Original Article

Europe

In a statement Tuesday, the international charity said former CEO Justin Forsyth was investigated twice after complaints from three women about his conduct in 2011 and 2015.On both occasions, the investigation led to "unreserved" apology from the chief executive and "the matters were closed," the statement said. The Save the Children allegations follow outrage over revelations that staff from British-based charity Oxfam abused their position of trust to engage in sexual acts with the people they were supposed to be helping.According to the BBC, which first reported the claims, Forsyth allegedly sent inappropriate text messages to young female staff about what they were wearing and how he felt about them.Forsyth left the charity at the end of January 2016 to take up a role as the deputy executive director at UNICEF.He's reported to have issued a separate statement Tuesday, saying he had made some "personal mistakes" during his time at Save the Children, and that he had thought "the issue closed many years ago.""I recognize that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues, which I now know caused offense and hurt," he said, according to the BBC.Sexual exploitation is widespread in the global aid sector, UK lawmakers toldUNICEF told CNN it is aware of the reports regarding the "past complaints" about Forsyth. In an email, UNICEF spokeswoman Najwa Mekki said, "We welcome Mr. Forsyth's decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr. Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action."Current Save the Children chief executive Kevin Watkins pledged a "root and branch review" of the charity's culture to check the safety of staff was being properly protected."The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018," a spokesman for Save the Children said in a statement."We apologize for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day."

Charities acknowledge sexual abuse issues

In February, Watkins told the House of Commons International Development Committee that sexual exploitation and abuse were a problem across the international aid sector.Earlier this week, Oxfam publicly released an internal report compiled in 2011 that details the organization's investigation into claims staffers had hired prostitutes while living in one of the charity's properties in Haiti.The report revealed that, during the investigation, three staff members accused of wrongdoing had "physically threatened and intimidated" a witness.In the end, four Oxfam employees were dismissed and three others resigned as a result of the investigation, including the former Haiti country director Roland van Hauwermeiren.The UK charity issued a formal apology to the Haiti government on Monday for their employees' behavior."Oxfam is grateful to the Haiti Government for allowing us the chance now to offer our humblest apologies and to begin explaining ourselves and start the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership, given our 40-year history with Haiti and its citizens," Simon Ticehurst, Oxfam's regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said in a statement.

Original Article

Europe

In a statement Tuesday, the international charity said former CEO Justin Forsyth was investigated twice after complaints from three women about his conduct in 2011 and 2015.On both occasions, the investigation led to "unreserved" apology from the chief executive and "the matters were closed," the statement said. The Save the Children allegations follow outrage over revelations that staff from British-based charity Oxfam abused their position of trust to engage in sexual acts with the people they were supposed to be helping.According to the BBC, which first reported the claims, Forsyth allegedly sent inappropriate text messages to young female staff about what they were wearing and how he felt about them.Forsyth left the charity at the end of January 2016 to take up a role as the deputy executive director at UNICEF.He's reported to have issued a separate statement Tuesday, saying he had made some "personal mistakes" during his time at Save the Children, and that he had thought "the issue closed many years ago.""I recognize that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues, which I now know caused offense and hurt," he said, according to the BBC.Sexual exploitation is widespread in the global aid sector, UK lawmakers toldUNICEF told CNN it is aware of the reports regarding the "past complaints" about Forsyth. In an email, UNICEF spokeswoman Najwa Mekki said, "We welcome Mr. Forsyth's decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr. Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action."Current Save the Children chief executive Kevin Watkins pledged a "root and branch review" of the charity's culture to check the safety of staff was being properly protected."The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018," a spokesman for Save the Children said in a statement."We apologize for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day."

Charities acknowledge sexual abuse issues

In February, Watkins told the House of Commons International Development Committee that sexual exploitation and abuse were a problem across the international aid sector.Earlier this week, Oxfam publicly released an internal report compiled in 2011 that details the organization's investigation into claims staffers had hired prostitutes while living in one of the charity's properties in Haiti.The report revealed that, during the investigation, three staff members accused of wrongdoing had "physically threatened and intimidated" a witness.In the end, four Oxfam employees were dismissed and three others resigned as a result of the investigation, including the former Haiti country director Roland van Hauwermeiren.The UK charity issued a formal apology to the Haiti government on Monday for their employees' behavior."Oxfam is grateful to the Haiti Government for allowing us the chance now to offer our humblest apologies and to begin explaining ourselves and start the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership, given our 40-year history with Haiti and its citizens," Simon Ticehurst, Oxfam's regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said in a statement.

Original Article

Europe

In a statement Tuesday, the international charity said former CEO Justin Forsyth was investigated twice after complaints from three women about his conduct in 2011 and 2015.On both occasions, the investigation led to "unreserved" apology from the chief executive and "the matters were closed," the statement said. The Save the Children allegations follow outrage over revelations that staff from British-based charity Oxfam abused their position of trust to engage in sexual acts with the people they were supposed to be helping.According to the BBC, which first reported the claims, Forsyth allegedly sent inappropriate text messages to young female staff about what they were wearing and how he felt about them.Forsyth left the charity at the end of January 2016 to take up a role as the deputy executive director at UNICEF.He's reported to have issued a separate statement Tuesday, saying he had made some "personal mistakes" during his time at Save the Children, and that he had thought "the issue closed many years ago.""I recognize that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues, which I now know caused offense and hurt," he said, according to the BBC.Sexual exploitation is widespread in the global aid sector, UK lawmakers toldUNICEF told CNN it is aware of the reports regarding the "past complaints" about Forsyth. In an email, UNICEF spokeswoman Najwa Mekki said, "We welcome Mr. Forsyth's decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr. Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action."Current Save the Children chief executive Kevin Watkins pledged a "root and branch review" of the charity's culture to check the safety of staff was being properly protected."The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018," a spokesman for Save the Children said in a statement."We apologize for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day."

Charities acknowledge sexual abuse issues

In February, Watkins told the House of Commons International Development Committee that sexual exploitation and abuse were a problem across the international aid sector.Earlier this week, Oxfam publicly released an internal report compiled in 2011 that details the organization's investigation into claims staffers had hired prostitutes while living in one of the charity's properties in Haiti.The report revealed that, during the investigation, three staff members accused of wrongdoing had "physically threatened and intimidated" a witness.In the end, four Oxfam employees were dismissed and three others resigned as a result of the investigation, including the former Haiti country director Roland van Hauwermeiren.The UK charity issued a formal apology to the Haiti government on Monday for their employees' behavior."Oxfam is grateful to the Haiti Government for allowing us the chance now to offer our humblest apologies and to begin explaining ourselves and start the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership, given our 40-year history with Haiti and its citizens," Simon Ticehurst, Oxfam's regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said in a statement.

Original Article

Europe

In a statement Tuesday, the international charity said former CEO Justin Forsyth was investigated twice after complaints from three women about his conduct in 2011 and 2015.On both occasions, the investigation led to "unreserved" apology from the chief executive and "the matters were closed," the statement said. The Save the Children allegations follow outrage over revelations that staff from British-based charity Oxfam abused their position of trust to engage in sexual acts with the people they were supposed to be helping.According to the BBC, which first reported the claims, Forsyth allegedly sent inappropriate text messages to young female staff about what they were wearing and how he felt about them.Forsyth left the charity at the end of January 2016 to take up a role as the deputy executive director at UNICEF.He's reported to have issued a separate statement Tuesday, saying he had made some "personal mistakes" during his time at Save the Children, and that he had thought "the issue closed many years ago.""I recognize that on a few occasions I had unsuitable and thoughtless conversations with colleagues, which I now know caused offense and hurt," he said, according to the BBC.Sexual exploitation is widespread in the global aid sector, UK lawmakers toldUNICEF told CNN it is aware of the reports regarding the "past complaints" about Forsyth. In an email, UNICEF spokeswoman Najwa Mekki said, "We welcome Mr. Forsyth's decision to come forward and acknowledge past mistakes. We are discussing this matter with Mr. Forsyth and his former employer so we can take appropriate action."Current Save the Children chief executive Kevin Watkins pledged a "root and branch review" of the charity's culture to check the safety of staff was being properly protected."The review will commence by the end of this week and report in June 2018," a spokesman for Save the Children said in a statement."We apologize for any pain these matters have caused and sincerely hope that the complainants feel able to help us with the review in the coming weeks. This is so that we can better support our skilled and highly valued staff as they help change the lives of millions of children around the world every day."

Charities acknowledge sexual abuse issues

In February, Watkins told the House of Commons International Development Committee that sexual exploitation and abuse were a problem across the international aid sector.Earlier this week, Oxfam publicly released an internal report compiled in 2011 that details the organization's investigation into claims staffers had hired prostitutes while living in one of the charity's properties in Haiti.The report revealed that, during the investigation, three staff members accused of wrongdoing had "physically threatened and intimidated" a witness.In the end, four Oxfam employees were dismissed and three others resigned as a result of the investigation, including the former Haiti country director Roland van Hauwermeiren.The UK charity issued a formal apology to the Haiti government on Monday for their employees' behavior."Oxfam is grateful to the Haiti Government for allowing us the chance now to offer our humblest apologies and to begin explaining ourselves and start the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership, given our 40-year history with Haiti and its citizens," Simon Ticehurst, Oxfam's regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, said in a statement.

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