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Those are the essentials of Chicago Crosby's job. She's a canner, someone who collects cans and bottles off the street and redeems them for 5 cents apiece. "This is New York," she says. "There are all sorts of ways to make money."Crosby has been canning since 2012. She is in her 50s, but won't specify her age. "I'm a lady. You understand that," she says, laughing. "Usually, every day I have, like, maybe about four to five of these hanging on this cart one place or another," she says, referring to multiple bags of cans and bottles. A full cart can be worth about $60. This way of life is physically demanding, often requiring the canner to push heavy carts long distances, sometimes through extreme weather. It also has safety concerns, as picking through the trash can lead to injuries from broken glass or exposure to dangerous waste. According to Ana Martínez de Luco, the co-founder of Sure We Can,a Brooklyn redemption center,canners are often low-income people. Many are retired or have a disability benefit they are trying to supplement. "It is just a community of people who usually felt excluded in many ways… having a very hard time," she says.Ten states including New York have "bottle bills" that require refundable deposits on cans and bottles. They are meant as a financial incentive to encourage recycling.Under laws like these, the customer pays an extra tax for a bottle or can at the store. Canners then pick up discarded cans and take them to a redemption center. The redemption center sells the can back to the original distributor, getting that tax back and an additional handling fee. Anyone can pick up cans. In New York City — widely considered one of the most expensive cities in America — the deposit value of a can has remained 5 cents since 1982. Federal legislation that would increase the refundable deposit to 10 cents nationwide was announced February 11 by US Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and US Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-Calif.) as part of a plan to address the plastic waste crisis. But bottle bills have faced opposition from the beverage industry over cost concerns, and only one such law has been passed since 1987.

Crosby says canning 'saved me'

Crosby used to work in the fashion industry, but then her mother got sick. She was forced to choose between her mother and her job, causing her financial situation to become dire. "Rather than jumping off of a building or ending up in the East River, I decided that I've got a daughter, I'm not going to do this, I'm not going to even think that way," she says. "Let me find some other way to live." Initially, Crosby was embarrassed and tried to hide her job from neighbors. But as time went on, she became more comfortable and ended up developing many relationships through canning. About 40 people hold their recycling specifically for her to pick up.She estimates she makes between $8,000 and $10,000 a year doing this."That keeps a roof over my head and food in my stomach," says Crosby, who lives in public housing and also tutors and does other odd jobs."I think about what I have. It's still a lot more than a lot of them have out here," she says. "I have a great daughter. I have a lot of things."Crosby says her daughter works for Amazon and lives in New Jersey, where she's working on her MBA. "The easiest part is going out there and getting all the stuff," Crosby says. "The hard part about it is… all the separation and the sorting and putting it away."Crosby brings her cans to Sure We Can, founded by Martínez de Luco and Eugene Gadsden in 2007. They say they collected more than 11 million pieces for recycling in 2018.Gadsden was a canner for 35 years and was homeless for part of that time. Martinez de Luco is a nun who advocates for policies that benefit canners, estimating 10,000 are in New York City.Some cans and bottles for miRead More – Source

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Amazon founder Jeff Bezos said Monday that he plans to spend $10 billion of his own fortune to help fight climate change.

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Bezos, the worlds richest man, said in an Instagram post that he'll start giving grants this summer to scientists, activists and nonprofits working to protect the earth.

“I want to work alongside others both to amplify known ways and to explore new ways of fighting the devastating impact of climate change,” Bezos said in the post.

Amazon, the company Bezos runs, has an enormous carbon footprint. Last year, Amazon officials said the company would work to have 100% of its energy use come from solar panels and other renewable energy by 2030.

The online retailer relies on fossil fuels to power planes, trucks and vans in order to ship billions of items all around the world. Amazon workers in its Seattle headquarters have been vocal in criticizing some of the companys practices, pushing it to do more to combat climate change.

Bezos said in the post Monday that he will call his new initiative the Bezos Earth Fund. An Amazon spokesman confirmed that Bezos will be using his oRead More – Source

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Speaking to reporters, Trout called the situation "sad for baseball.""I don't agree with the punishments, the players not getting anything," Trout said. "It was a player-driven thing. It sucks, too, because guys' careers have been affected, a lot of people lost jobs. It was tough. Me going up to the plate knowing what was coming — it would be pretty fun up there."The Astros were caught for creating a system to decode and communicate an opposing team's pitching signs during the team's 2017 championship season. While sign stealing is commonplace, it is illegal to use electronic devices to do so.Employees for the Astros used a live game feed of the center field camera to decode sign sequences and then relayed that information to hitters."I lost some respect for some of the guys," Trout said. "It's not good for baseball, and it's sad to see."Commissioner Rob ManfreRead More – Source

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A brother of Richard Doty alerted the Enfield Police Department after not hearing from him since Friday morning, Lt. Bryan Nolan said."Due to the temperature, there was concern about hypothermia and it was clear that time was of the essence for a successful outcome," the Enfield Police Department said in statement on Facebook.After searching for approximately 30 minutes with a drone, police said, they were able to locate Doty about 100 yards into the woods and down an embankment where he spent the night in temperatures around 9 degrees Fahrenheit. "It is becoming more common for us to use drones," Nolan said. When asked why they focused on the woods, Nolan said they already knew from Doty's previous behaviors that he might have wandered there.After he was rescued, Doty waRead More – Source

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More than 1,400 marijuana plants were seized Thursday when deputies served a search warrant and found that a large shop building adjacent to a home had been turned into a grow house, the sheriff's office said. Zhong Li, 36, was arrested there and is now facing illegal marijuana cultivation and other drug charges. He's been held at the Calaveras County Jail on a $100,000 bail. It's unclear whether Li has retained an attorney. The building had "dangerous electrical modifications" and was unsafe to occupy, thRead More – Source

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Brigitte Dan, who also goes by her Vietnamese name Von, was shopping for some dinner items with her mother and two children on Saturday night. The family was waiting at the meat department in the Zionsville store when a large brown animal came barreling toward them."I saw a huge deer run frantically toward me, at first I thought it was a German Shepard, so I pushed my kids out of the way but soon realized it was a deer!," Dan told CNN in an online message.Dan captured video of the animal sliding along the floor as it turned down an aisle. At one point, the deer even jumped over the meat counter."The store did have a surprise visitor last night, entering through the front door," Eric Halvorson, a Kroger spokeperson, told CNN. "As far as I know, this is a first for our division.""I hope, in her time near the meat case, the deer noticed our expanded selection ofRead More – Source

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As the death toll from mass shootings in the United States continues to rise, several US states have recently passed gun control laws. These "red flag" laws allow police or family members to petition a judge to order the temporary removal of firearms from a person who may present a danger to others or themselves. Colorado is the latest state to have passed a "red flag" lRead More – Source

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Sophia Negroponte, 27, was arrested Thursday night at a home in Rockville, Maryland, after reports of a stabbing, the Montgomery County Police Department said in a statement. Officers found a man, 24-year-old Yousuf Rasmussen, inside the home "suffering from what appeared to be a cutting wound," the statement said.He was pronounced dead at the home, police said.Detectives determined that Rasmussen and Negroponte were acquaintances and that they were involved in a disagreement while inside the home. the statement said. During the disagreement, Rasmussen was injured, police said.The cause and manner of Rasmussen's remains unknown, pending an autopsy by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore.It's unclear whether Negroponte has an attorney. Bond information for Negroponte is not yet available, the police statement said. Negroponte is the daughter of John Negroponte, a former US diplomat who servRead More – Source

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The Pearl River, which runs just east of downtown Jackson, hit its third-highest level on record Sunday morning at 36.38 feet. The river has been rising slower than expected but has reached its major flood stage and could crest at 38 feet by Monday — its highest point in decades — Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves told reporters. Several neighborhoods in northeast and downtown Jackson have been evacuated in anticipation of the flooding. After the governor declared a state of emergency on Saturday, law enforcement officers went door to door urging at least 510 people to leave their homes, Reeves said."We don't want to lose anyone as we respond to what is expected to be historic flood levels," the governor said. Authorities are expecting a "historic, unprecedented flood" that the city has not seen in more than 30 years, Reeves said. The river's highest level on record is 43.3 feet, set in April 1979. The next highest was 39.6 feet, set in May 1983.

Water is not expected to recede for days

If the river hits 38 feet a large number of homes will be flooded by 6 feet of water, roads will become impassable and residents won't be allowed to return home for days, emergency management officials said. "We don't anticipate the situation to end any time soon. It will be days before we are out of the woods and the water starts to recede," Reeves said. Water was nearly covering fire hydrants and mailboxes in parts of Jackson as some residents tried to evacuate. Scott Johnson, the owner of a tow truck company, took one of his trucks to a neighborhood to help residents."It's sad when you ride by the houses, you can see the waves," Johnson told CNN affiliate WAPT. "You barely move the truck and it's just splashing up and almost going in the houses."The city invited residents to pick up sandbags Saturday to use as water barriers at their homes. More than 96,000 sandbags have been delivered to Hinds County, the governor said.

Parts of Jackson are already flooded

The Pearl River flooded yards and roads in theRead More – Source

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Demonstrators daubed the words “femicide state” in blood-red on Mexicos presidential palace on Friday, before marching in heavy rain to the offices of newspaper La Prensa to protest against the recent publication of a gruesome image of a murder victim.

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The Valentines Day demonstration, led by women, was sparked by the killing of 25-year-old Ingrid Escamilla in Mexico City and the publication of graphic photos of her mutilated corpse in newspapers.

The protesters, numbering at least 200 and comprised mostly of women, burned vehicles belonging to La Prensa and briefly clashed with security forces who prevented them from entering the newspapers offices.

Chanting “not one more murder” and carrying signs saying “we demand responsible journalism,” “Ingrid we are all you” and “sexism kills,” the demonstrators demanded justice.

An average of 10 women a day are killed in Mexico. Last year marked a new overall homicide record, official data shows.

The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, also known as UN Women, said on Twitter that it condemned the killing of Escamilla.